News From Our Blog

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month By Putting Your Health First

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, @HHSgov and @HHSLatino are hosting a live bilingual Twitter chat on Monday, September 15th at 2 p.m. EST. The chat will focus on putting your health first and discuss how to to sign up for health coverage, how to find free resources to help you make healthy lifestyle decisions and how to make a difference in your community.

You’ll also have the opportunity to ask any health-related questions and get answers from the experts.

Join us and others from across the government to chat about the health challenges, preventive care and how to take charge of your health.

Use the hashtag #HHMSalud to join the conversation!

You don’t have to give children an allowance—but if you do, talk about it

By CFPB and FDIC

Giving children an allowance is a topic many parents discuss. Even within families, parents can disagree about whether it’s a good idea.

Research doesn’t conclusively prove whether or not having an allowance helps children achieve better financial well-being as adults. However, research does suggest how to make an allowance work well for your children, if you do decide to give one.

Don’t just hand over the money and leave it at that. Make it part of your conversations. Talk about what the family budget still covers. For example, you can clarify that the child’s meals with the family, school clothes, and school supplies are the family’s responsibility. The child’s own expenses, like clothes he wants to buy or apps she wants to add, should come from the allowance.

If you give the allowance weekly, check in each week and ask about what the child decided to do with the money. Did she save any of it for a future goal? What did he learn about spending, saving, or planning ahead? Does she want to make changes to how she spends money next time?

Some families decide to pay children for certain chores. If this sounds like your family, you can have similar conversations about what your child earned.

Whether to give an allowance at all is a choice each family should make. To make the most of an allowance if you choose to give one, commit to giving your child some of your own time and guidance along with it.

Image description: Today, at 8:46 AM EST we observe a moment of silence to remember the victims of September 11. This photo from the American History Museum shows a memorial outside the Time Square Fire Station in New York.

Image description: Today, at 8:46 AM EST we observe a moment of silence to remember the victims of September 11.

This photo from the American History Museum shows a memorial outside the Time Square Fire Station in New York.

Image description:
From the Archives Foundation:

Happy National Teddy Bear Day! Political cartoonist Clifford Berryman is credited with introducing the teddy bear into the American vernacular after President Theodore Roosevelt famously refused to shoot an old, haggard bear during a hunting trip. Berryman changed the old bear into a cute, cuddly “teddy bear”—named for the President—and it became a common symbol in Berryman’s cartoons.  This self-portrait shows Berryman’s “signature style” in the exhibit “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures,” on display in the National Archives Museum’s O’Brien Gallery through January 4, 2015.“Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives with the generous support of Lead Sponsor AT&T. Major additional support provided by the Lawrence F. O’Brien Family and members of the Board of the Foundation for the National Archives.  Image: "Self-Portrait of Clifford Berryman, 1904"

Image description:

From the Archives Foundation:

Happy National Teddy Bear Day! Political cartoonist Clifford Berryman is credited with introducing the teddy bear into the American vernacular after President Theodore Roosevelt famously refused to shoot an old, haggard bear during a hunting trip. Berryman changed the old bear into a cute, cuddly “teddy bear”—named for the President—and it became a common symbol in Berryman’s cartoons.

This self-portrait shows Berryman’s “signature style” in the exhibit Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures,” on display in the National Archives Museum’s O’Brien Gallery through January 4, 2015.

“Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives with the generous support of Lead Sponsor AT&T. Major additional support provided by the Lawrence F. O’Brien Family and members of the Board of the Foundation for the National Archives.

Image: "Self-Portrait of Clifford Berryman, 1904"

Disputing debt you never owed: William’s story

By: Ashley Gordon, CFPB

Watch William’s story

Being on the hook for a debt you don’t owe is not only stressful, but can be scary. If you don’t know where to turn, you might feel hopeless. We heard from William, who was receiving calls for a debt he didn’t owe. William tried to resolve the issue for over four years, seeing his credit get ruined in the process. He said “None of them could do anything… except tell me I had to pay them the $8,500.”

Stories like William’s are important because it’s often hard to know where to turn and who to trust for help. Because William submitted a complaint, he was able to end a four year long credit dispute in one week.

“Just to have the situation resolved…that just felt good.” William said. “In a situation for me that was seemingly endless and hopeless, the CFPB helped me to find resolution. It’s a new day.”    

We’re glad William got the help he needed, and we want to make sure that you know that we’re here for you too. To share your experience or learn more from others, visit us at www.consumerfinance.gov/yourstory.