News From Our Blog

Image description: Meet and talk with scientists, weather forecasters and hurricane hunter pilots and others who work to understand our environment, protect life and property, and conserve and protect natural resources at NOAA’s open house.
The event will be Saturday, Feb. 15, at NOAA’s location in Silver Spring, Md. 
There will be free activities, including engaging guest presentations, interactive exhibits, and hands-on activities for ages 5 and up, and early birds get a chance to take a tour of the National Weather Service’s Operations Center and NOAA Exploration Command Center.   
Find more details.

Image description: Meet and talk with scientists, weather forecasters and hurricane hunter pilots and others who work to understand our environment, protect life and property, and conserve and protect natural resources at NOAA’s open house.

The event will be Saturday, Feb. 15, at NOAA’s location in Silver Spring, Md. 

There will be free activities, including engaging guest presentations, interactive exhibits, and hands-on activities for ages 5 and up, and early birds get a chance to take a tour of the National Weather Service’s Operations Center and NOAA Exploration Command Center.   

Find more details.

Image description: This photo shows what’s known as a cloud inversion at Mather Point on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon.
Cloud inversions form through the interaction of warm and cold weather masses and occur at the Grand Canyon about once every 10 years.
You can see more photos of the cloud inversion on the Grand Canyon’s Flickr account.
From the Department of Interior:

Over the last few days you might have seen a few photos of the recent and rare inversion(s) at Grand Canyon National Park. We hope one more will be okay. Here’s another stunning photo from Mather Point. NPS Photo by Erin Whittaker

Image description: This photo shows what’s known as a cloud inversion at Mather Point on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon.

Cloud inversions form through the interaction of warm and cold weather masses and occur at the Grand Canyon about once every 10 years.

You can see more photos of the cloud inversion on the Grand Canyon’s Flickr account.

From the Department of Interior:

Over the last few days you might have seen a few photos of the recent and rare inversion(s) at Grand Canyon National Park. We hope one more will be okay. Here’s another stunning photo from Mather Point.

NPS Photo by Erin Whittaker

Image description:

From the National Archives:

Hurricanes in History

Hurricane Dennis made landfall on the panhandle of Florida on July 10, 2005.  Projected to be a Category 2 Hurricane it increased in strength to become a Category 4 after skirting to the west of Key West.  Dennis was the fourth named storm and second hurricane of the season.  One of the earliest and strongest Atlantic storms, Dennis was quickly surpassed by Hurricane Emily later that month.

 

Lightning Safety Tips

Summer is the peak season for lightning-related deaths and injuries, though people are struck by lightning year-round. 

The National Weather Service provides a wide range of information about lightning, including these facts and tips:


General Tips

  • No outdoor area is safe when you hear thunder.
  • If you hear thunder, find a safe indoor shelter (a substantial building or enclosed, metal-topped vehicle with the windows up).


Indoor Safety Tips

  • Stay off corded phones, computers, and other electrical equipment.
  • Avoid plumbing, including sinks, baths, and faucets.
  • Stay away from porches, windows, and doors.
  • Never lie on concrete floors or lean against concrete walls.


Outdoor Safety Tips

No outdoor area is safe during a thunderstorm, but if you’re caught outside with no safe shelter options, take these steps to reduce your risk of being struck by lightning:

  • Come down from elevated areas.
  • Never lie flat on the ground.
  • Never shelter under an isolated tree.
  • Never use a cliff or rocky overhang for shelter.
  • Immediately get out and away from ponds, lakes, and other bodies of water.
  • Stay away from objects that conduct electricity, such as wire fences.

 Read some interesting myths and facts about lightning. 

Image description: Weather forecasters say the storms moving through the Midwest could produce derechos. What are they?
According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center:

A derecho is a widespread, long-lived wind storm that is associated with a band of rapidly moving showers or thunderstorms. Although a derecho can produce destruction similar to that of tornadoes, the damage typically is directed in one direction along a relatively straight swath. As a result, the term “straight-line wind damage” sometimes is used to describe derecho damage.

Learn more about derechos.
This photo shows the shelf cloud that preceded a derecho in LaPorte, Indiana in June 2012. Photo courtesy of Kevin Gould / NOAA.

Image description: Weather forecasters say the storms moving through the Midwest could produce derechos. What are they?

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center:

A derecho is a widespread, long-lived wind storm that is associated with a band of rapidly moving showers or thunderstorms. Although a derecho can produce destruction similar to that of tornadoes, the damage typically is directed in one direction along a relatively straight swath. As a result, the term “straight-line wind damage” sometimes is used to describe derecho damage.

Learn more about derechos.

This photo shows the shelf cloud that preceded a derecho in LaPorte, Indiana in June 2012. Photo courtesy of Kevin Gould / NOAA.