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Image description: Cpl. Jack Wilson (left) and his brother, William R. Wilson, are photographed in Verdun, France on VE Day, May 7, 1945. Photo from the Veterans History Project.
William Wilson began his career with the Army in 1941. By the time he was discharged in 1945, his World War II photos had been published in Life and Look magazines and numbered in the hundreds. Learn more about Wilson and his contributions to history.
Wilson’s story and other stories from the brave men and women who served in the armed forces are available from the Library of Congress’ Veterans History Project. You can contribute by interviewing a veteran and submitting the story.
Contribute to the Veterans History Project or browse the stories.

Image description: Cpl. Jack Wilson (left) and his brother, William R. Wilson, are photographed in Verdun, France on VE Day, May 7, 1945. Photo from the Veterans History Project.

William Wilson began his career with the Army in 1941. By the time he was discharged in 1945, his World War II photos had been published in Life and Look magazines and numbered in the hundreds. Learn more about Wilson and his contributions to history.

Wilson’s story and other stories from the brave men and women who served in the armed forces are available from the Library of Congress’ Veterans History Project. You can contribute by interviewing a veteran and submitting the story.

Contribute to the Veterans History Project or browse the stories.

Today is the anniversary of the United States entering World War I. Read stories and see photos from the Veterans’ History Project.

Asked by Anonymous

civil war

More books have been written about the Civil War than any other event in American history. 2011-2015 marks the 150th commemoration of the Civil War.

While there were several causes for the Civil War, the 80 year debate over slavery between Northern and Southern states became the most important. The Civil War began with a successful Confederate assault on Fort Sumter in 1861. Most of the war was fought in the South, although the largest single battle was in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  

Learn more about this defining event in American history or find upcoming events, Civil War parks, or search for a solider.

Image description: This wedding dress was made from a nylon parachute that saved Major Claude Hensinger during World War II. 
Hensinger, a B-29 pilot, and his crew, were returning from a bombing raid over Yowata, Japan, in August 1944 when their engine caught fire. The crew was forced to bail out. He kept the parachute and used it to propose to his girlfriend Ruth in 1947. Learn more about the story behind this parachute wedding dress.
Photo from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History

Image description: This wedding dress was made from a nylon parachute that saved Major Claude Hensinger during World War II. 

Hensinger, a B-29 pilot, and his crew, were returning from a bombing raid over Yowata, Japan, in August 1944 when their engine caught fire. The crew was forced to bail out. He kept the parachute and used it to propose to his girlfriend Ruth in 1947. Learn more about the story behind this parachute wedding dress.

Photo from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History

Image description: This image, titled “Terrific Pounding Of German Lines by British Howitzers in the Battle of the Somme in 1917,” was published in the New York Times. During the World War I era (1914-18), leading newspapers took advantage of a new printing process that dramatically altered their ability to reproduce images. Rotogravure printing, which produced richly detailed, high quality illustrations—even on inexpensive newsprint paper—was used to create vivid new pictorial sections. Publishers that could afford to invest in the new technology saw sharp increases both in readership and advertising revenue.
Photo from the Library of Congress

Image description: This image, titled “Terrific Pounding Of German Lines by British Howitzers in the Battle of the Somme in 1917,” was published in the New York Times. During the World War I era (1914-18), leading newspapers took advantage of a new printing process that dramatically altered their ability to reproduce images. Rotogravure printing, which produced richly detailed, high quality illustrations—even on inexpensive newsprint paper—was used to create vivid new pictorial sections. Publishers that could afford to invest in the new technology saw sharp increases both in readership and advertising revenue.

Photo from the Library of Congress