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From the National Archives:

Cranks, Crack-pots, and Martians

"I suppose that by this time you have received many letters from numerous cranks and crack-pots who quickly became jitterbugs during the program. I was one of the thousands who heard this program and:
did not jump out of the window,
did not attempt suicide,
did not break my arm while beating a hasty retreat from my apartment,
did not anticipate a horrible death,
did not hear the Martians “rapping on my chamber door”,
did not see the monsters landing in war-like regalia in the park across the street…”
—Letter dated November 1, 1938, from J. V. Yaukey of Aberdeen, South Dakota, to the Federal Communications Commission regarding the “War of the Worlds” broadcast by Orson Welles’ Mercury Theater on the evening of October 30, 1938.

75 years ago on October 30, 1938, the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) broadcast an adaptation of The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells. The hour-long radio program began with an announcer introducing a musical performance and moments later interrupting with a special news bulletin describing the landing of Martians in New Jersey and their subsequent attacks with death rays. Although CBS made four announcements during the broadcast identifying it as a dramatic performance, millions of Americans who heard it were scared into some sort of action, many wrote letters. The newly created Federal Communications Commission received more than 600 letters about the broadcast, Not everyone took to the streets however, and many, like the writer of this letter, felt that others were overreacting.
via Prologue: "Jitterbugs" and "Crack-pots" Letters to the FCC about the “War of the Worlds” Broadcast 

Image description:

From the National Archives:

Cranks, Crack-pots, and Martians

"I suppose that by this time you have received many letters from numerous cranks and crack-pots who quickly became jitterbugs during the program. I was one of the thousands who heard this program and:

  • did not jump out of the window,
  • did not attempt suicide,
  • did not break my arm while beating a hasty retreat from my apartment,
  • did not anticipate a horrible death,
  • did not hear the Martians “rapping on my chamber door”,
  • did not see the monsters landing in war-like regalia in the park across the street…”
—Letter dated November 1, 1938, from J. V. Yaukey of Aberdeen, South Dakota, to the Federal Communications Commission regarding the “War of the Worlds” broadcast by Orson Welles’ Mercury Theater on the evening of October 30, 1938.

75 years ago on October 30, 1938, the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) broadcast an adaptation of The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells. The hour-long radio program began with an announcer introducing a musical performance and moments later interrupting with a special news bulletin describing the landing of Martians in New Jersey and their subsequent attacks with death rays. Although CBS made four announcements during the broadcast identifying it as a dramatic performance, millions of Americans who heard it were scared into some sort of action, many wrote letters. The newly created Federal Communications Commission received more than 600 letters about the broadcast, Not everyone took to the streets however, and many, like the writer of this letter, felt that others were overreacting.

via Prologue: "Jitterbugs" and "Crack-pots" Letters to the FCC about the “War of the Worlds” Broadcast 

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From the National Archives:

ourpresidents:

Bullet Proof Coat
This beige coat worn by President Gerald R. Ford was designed not only to keep him warm and dry but also to protect his life.This coat came with a bullet-proof vest liner along with more standard features like the six front buttons, adjustable sleeve cuffs, and pockets accessible from the inside. The zip-up bullet-proof vest is made of Kevlar and is covered with cloth identical in color to the coat. Together both pieces weigh 6 lbs., 15 oz.A label sewn onto the front of the vest provides cleaning instructions and gives an issue date of October 1975, the month after President Ford survived two assassination attempts during separate trips to California.
-from the Ford Library

President Gerald Ford escaped the first of two assassinations attempts within a month on September 5, 1975, when Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme’s gun failed to fire during the president’s trip to Sacramento.

Image descriptiom:

From the National Archives:

ourpresidents:

Bullet Proof Coat

This beige coat worn by President Gerald R. Ford was designed not only to keep him warm and dry but also to protect his life.

This coat came with a bullet-proof vest liner along with more standard features like the six front buttons, adjustable sleeve cuffs, and pockets accessible from the inside. The zip-up bullet-proof vest is made of Kevlar and is covered with cloth identical in color to the coat. Together both pieces weigh 6 lbs., 15 oz.

A label sewn onto the front of the vest provides cleaning instructions and gives an issue date of October 1975, the month after President Ford survived two assassination attempts during separate trips to California.

-from the Ford Library

President Gerald Ford escaped the first of two assassinations attempts within a month on September 5, 1975, when Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme’s gun failed to fire during the president’s trip to Sacramento.

Image description: Today marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The march was landmark civil rights demonstration held in 1963.
The Library of Congress digitized thousands of pictures from the march. Learn more about the march and view the photos from this historic day.
Photo from the Library of Congress.

Image description: Today marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The march was landmark civil rights demonstration held in 1963.

The Library of Congress digitized thousands of pictures from the march. Learn more about the march and view the photos from this historic day.

Photo from the Library of Congress.

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From the Peace Corps:

This PSA may be vintage, but the message is still true today! 

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From the Peace Corps:

This PSA may be vintage, but the message is still true today! 

Search online for historical documents from George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and others at