News From Our Blog

Image Description: An original Kodak camera from 1888.
This Original Kodak camera, introduced by George Eastman, placed the power of photography in the hands of anyone who could press a button. 
Unlike earlier cameras that used a glass-plate negative for each exposure, the Kodak came preloaded with a 100-exposure roll of flexible film. After finishing the roll, the consumer mailed the camera back to the factory to have the prints made. 
In capturing everyday moments and memories, the Kodak’s distinctive circular snapshots defined a new style of photography — informal, personal, and fun.
More about the camera from the National Museum of American History.

Image Description: An original Kodak camera from 1888.

This Original Kodak camera, introduced by George Eastman, placed the power of photography in the hands of anyone who could press a button.

Unlike earlier cameras that used a glass-plate negative for each exposure, the Kodak came preloaded with a 100-exposure roll of flexible film. After finishing the roll, the consumer mailed the camera back to the factory to have the prints made.

In capturing everyday moments and memories, the Kodak’s distinctive circular snapshots defined a new style of photography — informal, personal, and fun.

More about the camera from the National Museum of American History.

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From the National Archives:

The “Hello Girls”

"American telephone girls on arrival for "hello" duty in France. They all can speak both English and French., 03/1918"

During World War I, over 400 women were enrolled in the U.S. Army Signal Corps to operate telephone* switchboards in France.  Despite the sometimes hazardous conditions of their service, they were denied veterans status after the war ended.  It would take 60 years until a bill was signed by President Carter granting them veterans status in 1978.
Read more about the “Hello Girls” at the Signal Corps “Regimental” History Site - The Hello Girls

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From the National Archives:

The “Hello Girls”

"American telephone girls on arrival for "hello" duty in France. They all can speak both English and French., 03/1918"

During World War I, over 400 women were enrolled in the U.S. Army Signal Corps to operate telephone* switchboards in France.  Despite the sometimes hazardous conditions of their service, they were denied veterans status after the war ended.  It would take 60 years until a bill was signed by President Carter granting them veterans status in 1978.

Read more about the “Hello Girls” at the Signal Corps “Regimental” History Site - The Hello Girls

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From the National Archives:

"ODD NUMBERS TODAY"

"On January 31, 1974, an odd-numbered day, motorists with odd-numbered license plates could obtain gasoline at this station. The limit was 15 gallons. 01/1974"
David Falconer, photographer. From the series: DOCUMERICA: The Environmental Protection Agency’s Program to Photographically Document Subjects of Environmental Concern, 1972 - 1977 

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From the National Archives:

"ODD NUMBERS TODAY"

"On January 31, 1974, an odd-numbered day, motorists with odd-numbered license plates could obtain gasoline at this station. The limit was 15 gallons. 01/1974"

David Falconer, photographer. From the series: DOCUMERICA: The Environmental Protection Agency’s Program to Photographically Document Subjects of Environmental Concern, 1972 - 1977 

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From the National Archives:

The “Landlord’s Game”

Patented January 5, 1904, this is the printed patent drawing for a game board invented by Lizzie J. Magie, a variation of which would later become the board game “Monopoly.”

Image description: Explore historical artifacts — including the Wright Brothers airplane and Amelia Earhart’s flight suit — online in 3D through the Smithsonian Institute’s newest project. 
The Smithsonian X 3D Web site lets you manipulate 3D images of the artifacts, allowing you to zoom in and out, spin the object and more.
Check it out at 3d.si.edu.

Image description: Explore historical artifacts — including the Wright Brothers airplane and Amelia Earhart’s flight suit — online in 3D through the Smithsonian Institute’s newest project. 

The Smithsonian X 3D Web site lets you manipulate 3D images of the artifacts, allowing you to zoom in and out, spin the object and more.

Check it out at 3d.si.edu.