News From Our Blog

How to Treat Pollen Allergies in the Summer

Pollen is the main trigger of allergies in the summer. Pollen allergies can cause sneezing, nasal congestion, coughing and itchiness in the nose, eyes and throat.

According to the Food and Drug Administration, about 35 million Americans suffer from pollen allergy, commonly known as hay fever.

Follow these tips to prevent or treat this type of allergies.

Allergy prevention

  • Limit your outdoor activities in the mornings, a time when pollen levels are at their highest.
  • Take a shower and change clothes at home if you were outdoors. This will help clear out any pollen left on your hair, body and clothing.
  • Avoid hanging your clothes to dry outdoors.
  • Keep your home and car windows closed on sunny, windy days. If possible, use air conditioning.
  • Avoid mowing the lawn or sweeping the deck or patio too often.

Allergy medicine

Certain medicines may help alleviate symptoms of allergies or allergic rhinitis. Talk to your doctor about the right allergy medications for you. 

Some common allergy medications include:

  • Nasal and oral decongestants
  • Antihistamines in pill, syrup, or drop form
  • Nasal sprays, with or without corticosteroid

Allergy tests

If your symptoms are too difficult to manage with medication, your doctor can perform a skin allergy test to get a more accurate diagnosis. Based on the results, the doctor will prescribe the proper course of treatment.

Read this note in Spanish.

Love and care for your heart

Your heart is the engine of your body. And even though you might think it’s working normally, this major organ requires special care and attention.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 600,000 people in the United States die each year from heart disease. The CDC also reports that a quarter of Hispanics have high blood pressure.

There are many types of heart complications, but one of the most common is coronary heart disease.

What is coronary heart disease and what are the causes?

This illness — called atherosclerosis — happens when plaque forms in the artery walls, restricting normal blood flow through the body. This plaque is made up of cholesterol, calcium and other substances.

There are many risks factors causing coronary heart diseases, some related to your lifestyle or medical conditions, including:

  • High cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Being overweight
  • Excessive alcohol consumption
  • Smoking, among others

Health consequences

When a clogged artery restricts your flow of blood, you may experience these symptoms:

  • Chest pains
  • Irregular heartbeat or arrhythmias
  • Heart failure, or even a heart attack

Prevention and treatment

To reduce the risk of getting these or other heart diseases, take your blood pressure every six months and go over the results with your doctor. It’s also a good idea to eat well, exercise and not smoke.

Along with a balanced diet and exercise regimen, your physician may also prescribe medication to treat heart disease. If your condition is more advanced, bypass surgery may be needed to allow the blood to return to its normal flow.

Stay informed

Million Hearts is a national initiative where you can find information about heart disease. It also offers the opportunity to help prevent one million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.

Read this note in Spanish.