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From Smithsonian:

Everything you wanted to know about the design history of the beach chair from our Lemelson Center for the Study of Innovation:
Invention Hits the Beach | Bright Ideas

Image description:

From Smithsonian:

Everything you wanted to know about the design history of the beach chair from our Lemelson Center for the Study of Innovation:

Invention Hits the Beach | Bright Ideas

Image description: Researchers from the lab of biomedical engineering professor Bin He of the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering demonstrate a system that allows people to control a flying robot using only their mind. The research is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF). 
The researchers learned to use their thoughts to steer the robot around a gym, making it turn, rise, dip and sail through a ring. The technology may one day enable people who have lost speech and mobility due to neurodegenerative diseases to regain function by controlling artificial limbs, wheelchairs or other devices using only their mind. Brain waves (EEG) are picked up by the electrodes of a cap on the scalp, not a chip implanted in the brain.
Image courtesy of the University of Minnesota and the NSF.

Image description: Researchers from the lab of biomedical engineering professor Bin He of the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering demonstrate a system that allows people to control a flying robot using only their mind. The research is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF).

The researchers learned to use their thoughts to steer the robot around a gym, making it turn, rise, dip and sail through a ring. The technology may one day enable people who have lost speech and mobility due to neurodegenerative diseases to regain function by controlling artificial limbs, wheelchairs or other devices using only their mind. Brain waves (EEG) are picked up by the electrodes of a cap on the scalp, not a chip implanted in the brain.

Image courtesy of the University of Minnesota and the NSF.

Image description: A NOAA archaeologist photographs a wreck site in Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary using specially a constructed sled mounted with a high-resolution camera.
Photo from NOAA.

Image description: A NOAA archaeologist photographs a wreck site in Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary using specially a constructed sled mounted with a high-resolution camera.

Photo from NOAA.

Image description: USGS scientists examine thermal imagery of wolves for assessing impacts of sarcoptic mange on the survival, reproduction and social behavior of this species in Yellowstone National Park. 
Sarcoptic mange is a highly contagious canine skin disease, caused by mites that burrow into the skin causing infections, hair loss, severe irritation and an insatiable desire to scratch. The resulting hair loss and depressed vigor of an infected animal leaves them vulnerable to hypothermia, malnutrition and dehydration, which can eventually lead to death.
Note the bright red patch on the wolf’s hindquarters in this thermal image of a captive wolf at the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in West Yellowstone. This is where fur was shaved to replicate the loss of fur associated with sarcoptic mange. The fur will eventually grow back. All research animals are handled by following the specific requirements of USGS Animal Care and Use policies. Learn more at bit.ly/usgswolf.

Image description: USGS scientists examine thermal imagery of wolves for assessing impacts of sarcoptic mange on the survival, reproduction and social behavior of this species in Yellowstone National Park.

Sarcoptic mange is a highly contagious canine skin disease, caused by mites that burrow into the skin causing infections, hair loss, severe irritation and an insatiable desire to scratch. The resulting hair loss and depressed vigor of an infected animal leaves them vulnerable to hypothermia, malnutrition and dehydration, which can eventually lead to death.

Note the bright red patch on the wolf’s hindquarters in this thermal image of a captive wolf at the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in West Yellowstone. This is where fur was shaved to replicate the loss of fur associated with sarcoptic mange. The fur will eventually grow back. All research animals are handled by following the specific requirements of USGS Animal Care and Use policies. 

Learn more at bit.ly/usgswolf.