News From Our Blog

In the new year, there may be lots of bogus weight loss drugs trying to lure you in. Hold on to your money and avoid scams with these tips from the Federal Trade Commission.

Image description: The IRS is warning of a phone scam targeting tax payers.
Scammers are calling tax payers and telling them they owe the IRS money and need to pay it immediately through a pre-loaded credit card or wire transfer.
If you don’t pay, the scammers claim you could be arrested, deported or have your driver’s or business license suspended.
Remember, the IRS will never initiate contact with you over the phone, email or social media to request personal information.
Visit IRS.gov to learn more about the scam and how to report it.

Image description: The IRS is warning of a phone scam targeting tax payers.

Scammers are calling tax payers and telling them they owe the IRS money and need to pay it immediately through a pre-loaded credit card or wire transfer.

If you don’t pay, the scammers claim you could be arrested, deported or have your driver’s or business license suspended.

Remember, the IRS will never initiate contact with you over the phone, email or social media to request personal information.

Visit IRS.gov to learn more about the scam and how to report it.

Watch Out for Scams Targeting Military Members or Veterans

There are a number of scams currently circulating that target members of the military and veterans, such as fake military charities, identity theft targeting active service members, and veteran pension scams.

In general, all of these scams try to take advantage of military members by offering to provide a service and then taking your money, while you get nothing in return.

You can learn more about specific scams by visiting the Scams Targeting Service Members or Veterans section of StopFraud.gov.

If you’ve been the victim of a scam, there are a few ways to file a complaint:

StopFraud.gov offers information about how to report financial fraud.

Tips to Avoid Online Dating Scams

You hear about it in the news, on social media, and elsewhere - someone has been scammed through an online dating site. You think “That could never happen to me.” But online dating scams have become so sophisticated; anyone can be easily duped these days. Use these resources to prevent an online dating scam before it happens to you:

  • An online love interest who asks you for money is most certainly a scam artist. They start by proclaiming their love, in hopes of gaining interest and trust as quickly as they can. Often, they want to interact with you over personal accounts rather than the online dating site, to get more personal information about you. Review signs of a scam artist so you are on the look out for blatant signs of a scammer.

  • In many instances, scammers will say they are American, but are working or traveling abroad. They may then say that a traumatic incident has happened in their life and they need some money to get home, or to visit you. While the State Department strongly discourages sending money to someone you don’t personally know, you can use a State Department Overseas Citizen Services (OCS) Trust, which is sent through Western Union directly to the nearest U.S. embassy to be picked up by your loved one.
  • The FBI also warns of another scam in which a con artist turns a conversation intimate, and then threatens to post the conversation and intimate information online, saying you can only get out of it if you pay them, even with no assurance that they will actually do what they say. Get more tips from the FBI on recognizing online dating scam artists.

No one can remove negative information from your credit report. Repair your credit and learn to recognize scams.