News From Our Blog

Three out of four car seats are not used correctly. Learn how to pick the right car seat, use it properly and more with this guide.

Things to Keep in Mind as you Prepare for Vacation

AAA estimates that two-thirds of American adults plan to vacation this summer. If you are one of them, here are a few things to keep in mind as you prepare to get away.

  • Put a hold on your mail. Mail stacking up is a good indicator to people that nobody is home. To be on the safe side, have your mail held at the post office until you return.

  • Check for travel alerts / warnings for your destination from the State Department. The world can be unstable, and sometimes dangerous for visitors in certain places. Make sure the risks are minimal wherever you are going.

  • You may not need a passport. A passport card is more convenient and less expensive than a passport book. It can be used for non-air travel to Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Bermuda.

  • Be careful online. Announcing your vacation via social media channels also tells people you aren’t home, and makes your house vulnerable.

Graco Recalls Car Seats Due to Harness Buckle Problem

Graco Children’s Products is recalling several of its car seats due to a faulty buckle. The buckle can get stuck in the latched position, making it difficult to remove your child from the seat and increasing the risk of injury in an emergency.

Visit the Graco website to look up affected models. If your car seat is included in the recall, you can order a free replacement harness buckle.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) encourages parents and caregivers to consider using an alternative car seat until the buckle is fixed.

If you need more information about the Graco recall, or recalls for any other car seat, you can look up car seat recalls over the past 10 years, or call the NHTSA hotline at 1-888-327-4236.

Be sure to register your car seat so that you are notified in the event of a recall.

This guide shows proper temperatures for cooking meats to be safe during your cookouts: 

How to Prepare for Hurricane Season

The Atlantic hurricane season begins each year on June 1 and ends on November 30.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, more than 35 million people live in areas that can be affected by hurricanes.

The strong winds, heavy rains and flooding that go along with hurricanes can cause serious damage to property and endanger lives. Being informed about what to do before, during and after a hurricane can help you and your family stay safe and prevent property damage.

Before and during the storm

  • Be aware of any emergency alert signals issued by authorities
  • Get to know the evacuation routes and emergency procedures of the places you and your family frequent, such as school or your office building
  • Identify the most secure places in your home, which can be a room with few windows, a hallway or a basement
  • Find evacuation and emergency shelters for your neighborhood
  • Put together an emergency supply kit
  • Use shutters to cover your house’s windows
  • Make sure blinds and windows are closed

In case of an evacuation

  • Tune your radio to NOAA’s National Weather Service to know what to do and where to go
  • If you are away from your family, make a plan where to meet once the hurricane passes
  • Shut windows and doors and unplug any electrical appliances before leaving the house
  • Pack a bag with clothes, medicine, important documents, cash and your emergency kit
  • Drive only on roads that have been approved by officials and avoid taking shortcuts that could be hazardous

Returning home

  • Return home only when authorities say the danger has passed
  • Don’t walk or drive in flooded areas or unstable structures, such as bridges or alternate routes
  • Check the area outside your house before going in, as there could be loose power lines or other dangerous objects that aren’t immediately visible
  • Do not go inside if you smell gas or if there are signs of any flooding or fire as the home’s structure may be weakened
  • Take photos of any damaged areas to use when filing a claim with your insurance company

Resources

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