News From Our Blog

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From the Department of Interior:

Here is a unique view of the Washington Monument you don’t see every day.Photo: Diana Bowen, National Park Service

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From the Department of Interior:

Here is a unique view of the Washington Monument you don’t see every day.

Photo: Diana Bowen, National Park Service

mypubliclands:

Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area extends out from the Oregon coast, one mile into the Pacific Ocean. Standing 93 feet tall at the westernmost point of the basalt headland, the lighthouse has been a bright beacon of the night, guiding ships and their supplies along the west coast since the light was first lit on August 20, 1873.

The offshore islands are a year-round refuge for harbor seals and a spring-summer home for thousands of nesting seabirds. Gray whales can be spotted during their annual migrations to Mexico (late fall-early winter) and Alaska (late winter-early spring). During the summer months some gray whales take the opportunity to feed in the shallow waters around the headland.

Learn more: http://on.doi.gov/1lZfhcC

Photos: Bob Wick, BLM-California

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From the Department of Interior:

Snow + a rainbow + Yosemite National Park = this amazing photo. Photo: Leasha Hooker (www.sharetheexperience.org)

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From the Department of Interior:

Snow + a rainbow + Yosemite National Park = this amazing photo.

Photo: Leasha Hooker (www.sharetheexperience.org)

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The Department of Interior frequently shares beautiful images of our nation’s public lands. Check out the 14 best photos Interior shared in 2013 as ranked by ABC News.
From the Department of Interior:

One more best of 2013 before we hit the new year!abcnews:

The 14 best photos shared by U.S. Department of the Interior in 2013 - PHOTOS: http://abcn.ws/1fZ9a6w
The caretakers of some of the world’s most majestic places and America’s most hallowed grounds, the U.S. Dept. of the Interior is also responsible for making those places as accessible to people as possible.
In the digital age, social media has become a strategically powerful tool to share images of these places with those who are usually far away, but want to remain connected to the places they love, according to Interior Director of Digital Strategy Tim Fullerton.
“We’ve found that our most powerful asset in promoting America’s public lands through social media is the use of breathtaking imagery,” Fullerton said. “Photos of America’s National Parks, Wildlife Refuges and other public lands are perfect sharing material for social media.”
Fullerton says people connect with the photos shared by @Interior – “whether they are reminded of a previous visit or are simply blown away by their sheer beauty, our photos are shared more than any other content we post.”
The strategy has triggered a 175 percent, or 80,000+, follower increase for @Interior in 2013 alone. Fullerton also credits the account with helping the Interior’s website grow to 4 million unique visitors – up 1.3 million from 2012.
“We’ve listened to the public.”
—@MicahGrimes

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The Department of Interior frequently shares beautiful images of our nation’s public lands. Check out the 14 best photos Interior shared in 2013 as ranked by ABC News.

From the Department of Interior:

One more best of 2013 before we hit the new year!

abcnews
:

The 14 best photos shared by U.S. Department of the Interior in 2013 - PHOTOS: http://abcn.ws/1fZ9a6w

The caretakers of some of the world’s most majestic places and America’s most hallowed grounds, the U.S. Dept. of the Interior is also responsible for making those places as accessible to people as possible.

In the digital age, social media has become a strategically powerful tool to share images of these places with those who are usually far away, but want to remain connected to the places they love, according to Interior Director of Digital Strategy Tim Fullerton.

“We’ve found that our most powerful asset in promoting America’s public lands through social media is the use of breathtaking imagery,” Fullerton said. “Photos of America’s National Parks, Wildlife Refuges and other public lands are perfect sharing material for social media.”

Fullerton says people connect with the photos shared by @Interior – “whether they are reminded of a previous visit or are simply blown away by their sheer beauty, our photos are shared more than any other content we post.”

The strategy has triggered a 175 percent, or 80,000+, follower increase for @Interior in 2013 alone. Fullerton also credits the account with helping the Interior’s website grow to 4 million unique visitors – up 1.3 million from 2012.

“We’ve listened to the public.”

@MicahGrimes

Learn About Lincoln’s Beginnings at Abraham Lincoln’s Birthplace

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Summer is a great time to take advantage of our national parks and monuments. Many offer free or low-cost admissions and programs perfect for families. So this summer we will be featuring one of our country’s public lands every week and highlighting things you and your family can do there.

Abraham Lincoln Birthplace

Image description: A newly restored cabin at Knob Creek. Photo from the National Park Service.

Hidden away in central Kentucky is the birthplace of our 16th president, Abraham Lincoln. While many people know who Lincoln is, many do not know about his humble beginnings as a boy growing up in the Kentucky wilderness. At Abraham Lincoln’s Birthplace, you will find a window into the history of one of America’s most popular presidents.

 On February 12, 1809, Nancy Hanks Lincoln gave birth to Abraham in a small one room log cabin. In 1811, the family moved 10 miles away to Knob Creek and lived in a cabin at Knob Creek from the time Abraham was about two years old until he was eight. There are recorded instances of Lincoln talking about his years at Knob Creek, and how he and his sister Sarah, planted gardens, how he almost drowned but a childhood friend saved him, and where he first saw slaves being taken to be sold.

It is said that Lincoln’s humility and values he held throughout his life were instilled in him from his early days on the frontier in Kentucky. While living at Knob Creek, Lincoln’s father, Thomas Lincoln, worked the land and kept his children outside appreciating the outdoors. When Lincoln attended school, he and his sister would walk two miles each way.

At Abraham Lincoln’s Birthplace, you can also explore the nature that Lincoln himself enjoyed so much. Discover the beautiful waters of Sinking Spring and Knob Creek, and hike through the wildlife and forests of central Kentucky.

Visit the National Park Service’s Abraham Lincoln Birthplace website to learn more about the historical background and natural wildlife near Knob Creek, and get information on visiting hours and programs for kids, teachers and families.