News From Our Blog

Image description: According to the Centers for Disease Control, colorectal cancer is the second leading cancer killer among men and women in the United States, after lung cancer. But about 1 in 3 adults is not getting screened for colorectal cancer as recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). 
This infographic helps you pick the right screening test for you. 
You can find the full text of this graphic from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Image description: According to the Centers for Disease Control, colorectal cancer is the second leading cancer killer among men and women in the United States, after lung cancer. But about 1 in 3 adults is not getting screened for colorectal cancer as recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). 

This infographic helps you pick the right screening test for you. 

You can find the full text of this graphic from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Love and care for your heart

Your heart is the engine of your body. And even though you might think it’s working normally, this major organ requires special care and attention.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 600,000 people in the United States die each year from heart disease. The CDC also reports that a quarter of Hispanics have high blood pressure.

There are many types of heart complications, but one of the most common is coronary heart disease.

What is coronary heart disease and what are the causes?

This illness — called atherosclerosis — happens when plaque forms in the artery walls, restricting normal blood flow through the body. This plaque is made up of cholesterol, calcium and other substances.

There are many risks factors causing coronary heart diseases, some related to your lifestyle or medical conditions, including:

  • High cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Being overweight
  • Excessive alcohol consumption
  • Smoking, among others

Health consequences

When a clogged artery restricts your flow of blood, you may experience these symptoms:

  • Chest pains
  • Irregular heartbeat or arrhythmias
  • Heart failure, or even a heart attack

Prevention and treatment

To reduce the risk of getting these or other heart diseases, take your blood pressure every six months and go over the results with your doctor. It’s also a good idea to eat well, exercise and not smoke.

Along with a balanced diet and exercise regimen, your physician may also prescribe medication to treat heart disease. If your condition is more advanced, bypass surgery may be needed to allow the blood to return to its normal flow.

Stay informed

Million Hearts is a national initiative where you can find information about heart disease. It also offers the opportunity to help prevent one million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.

Read this note in Spanish.

National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month

From the State Departmentt:

On December 31, 2013, President Barack Obama proclaimed January as National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month. He called upon private businesses, civil society groups, faith leaders, families, and individuals to recognize the vital role they can each play in ending all forms of modern slavery.

Learn what you can do in your own life to fight human trafficking on DipNote.

Join a Twitter Chat and Learn about Affordable Cervical Cancer Prevention Options

Cervical cancer is preventable in most cases. However, for many women, especially women of color, immigrant women, and LGBTQ persons, the care they need to prevent and treat cervical cancer is out of reach financially

You can learn about affordable prevention options during a Twitter chat on Jan. 16 at 2 p.m. ET.

To ask your questions and follow the conversation, use the hashtag #OurSalud and learn about resources from experts at the White House, the Department of Health and Human Services and more.

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From Stopbullying.gov:

While you may feel sorry for those who are bullied, you may not know how to help. Here are some ways you can be more than a bystander.

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From Stopbullying.gov:

While you may feel sorry for those who are bullied, you may not know how to help. Here are some ways you can be more than a bystander.