News From Our Blog

Image description: Today in 1965, President Johnson signed Medicare into law. President Truman became its first beneficiary and got the first Medicare card.This photo shows Johnson signing the Medicare law. Shown with the President (on the right in the photo) are (left to right) Mrs. Johnson; former President Harry Truman; Vice-President Hubert Humphrey; and Mrs. Truman.
Photo courtesy of LBJ Presidential Library.

Image description: Today in 1965, President Johnson signed Medicare into law. President Truman became its first beneficiary and got the first Medicare card.

This photo shows Johnson signing the Medicare law. Shown with the President (on the right in the photo) are (left to right) Mrs. Johnson; former President Harry Truman; Vice-President Hubert Humphrey; and Mrs. Truman.

Photo courtesy of LBJ Presidential Library.

Image description: Today in 1940, President Franklin Roosevelt was nominated to a third term. A four-term president, he was the only one to serve more than two.
Learn more about FDR’s presidency.

Image description: Today in 1940, President Franklin Roosevelt was nominated to a third term. A four-term president, he was the only one to serve more than two.

Learn more about FDR’s presidency.

Image description: Today in 1850, our 12th president , Zachary Taylor, died in office after sudden illness.
Learn more about his time in office.

Image description: Today in 1850, our 12th president , Zachary Taylor, died in office after sudden illness.

Learn more about his time in office.

Image description: Today in 1886, Grover Cleveland got married in the White House. His wife was the youngest first lady in history at age 21. 
Learn more about Grover Cleveland’s presidency. 
Photo from the Library of Congress.

Image description: Today in 1886, Grover Cleveland got married in the White House. His wife was the youngest first lady in history at age 21.

Learn more about Grover Cleveland’s presidency.

Photo from the Library of Congress.

Image description:
From the National Archives:

Did you know that President Ford signed legislation to ensure Veterans Day wouldn’t fall on Monday every year?Since World War I the United States traditionally commemorated Veterans Day on November 11, which had formerly been recognized as Armistice Day. The “Monday holiday” law passed in 1968 established a uniform holiday schedule for the Federal Government but as a consequence moved the observance of Veterans Day to the fourth Monday in October.Although the official Federal holiday was observed on Mondays for several years many people continued to hold commemorations on November 11 as well. In September 1975 President Ford signed into law S.331 officially designating the original date as Veterans Day.“I believe restoration of the observance of Veterans Day to November 11 will help preserve in the hearts and lives of all Americans the spirit of patriotism, the love of country and the willingness to serve and sacrifice for the common good symbolized by this very special day,” President Ford said in his signing statement.
-from the Ford Library

Image description:

From the National Archives:

Did you know that President Ford signed legislation to ensure Veterans Day wouldn’t fall on Monday every year?

Since World War I the United States traditionally commemorated Veterans Day on November 11, which had formerly been recognized as Armistice Day. The “Monday holiday” law passed in 1968 established a uniform holiday schedule for the Federal Government but as a consequence moved the observance of Veterans Day to the fourth Monday in October.

Although the official Federal holiday was observed on Mondays for several years many people continued to hold commemorations on November 11 as well. In September 1975 President Ford signed into law S.331 officially designating the original date as Veterans Day.

“I believe restoration of the observance of Veterans Day to November 11 will help preserve in the hearts and lives of all Americans the spirit of patriotism, the love of country and the willingness to serve and sacrifice for the common good symbolized by this very special day,” President Ford said in his signing statement.

-from the Ford Library