News From Our Blog

Up-to-date Japan tsunami and radiation information from the Environmental Protection Agency, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of State and other agencies can now be found at USA.gov/Japan2011.

Look for USA.gov Short URLs

If you use Twitter, you may have noticed a lot of tweets with 1.USA.gov URLs in them over the past week. Those are the result of a new service that we created with bit.ly, the popular URL shortening service. Now, whenever anyone uses bit.ly to shorten a URL that ends in .gov or .mil, they will receive a 1.USA.gov URL in return.

This makes it easier for people know when they encounter links to official government information on Twitter and other services where people use short URLs. You can be certain that every time you see a short URL with USA.gov in it, it will take you to a trustworthy source of official government information.

Another great thing about this service is that every click on a 1.USA.gov URL gets counted, which allows us to see what government information people are choosing to share and click on. Here’s a list of the most popular popular government URLs from the past week:

  1. 4,592 clicks — NASA - Dallas Family’s Tradition Boosts NASA for 100 Flights
  2. 3,593 clicks — NASA - ‘Elephant Trunks’ in Space
  3. 3,531 clicks — NASA - Multimedia - Video Gallery
  4. 3,239 clicks — Air Force officials identify Frankfurt Airport shooting deaths
  5. 3,160 clicks — Human Space Flight (HSF) - Realtime Data
  6. 2,901 clicks — Magnitude 6.6 - SOLOMON ISLANDS
  7. 1,979 clicks — NASA - Captured From the Ground
  8. 1,915 clicks — Air Force Week in Photos
  9. 1,720 clicks — PDF of presentation by Rep Paul Ryan
  10. 1,702 clicks — NASA - Anchored

We’ll be sharing information on popular links more regularly in the future. We hope you find them interesting and useful.

Please feel free to contact us by email or on Twitter at @USAgov if you have any other questions about USA.gov short URLs.

Meet the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Logo of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Logo of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

This week is National Consumer Protection Week, and Elizabeth Warren has written a great post on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) blog about how she and the CFPB are working to help citizens understand the costs of borrowing money.

From the blog post:

Too many families that work hard and play by the rules are stretched to the breaking point. They have taken on debt to pay for college, a home, and other needs. The latest economic crisis is just one more blow in an increasingly dangerous economic world.

There was a time when the basic terms governing consumer financial products were pretty easy to see. But that has changed. Today, too many lenders hide complex terms among pages and pages of fine print in credit agreements, making it hard for borrowers to compare one product to two or three others.

The CFPB is working to change that. When prices and risks are clear up front, consumers can make the choices that are best for themselves and their families. In other words, we want a credit market that works for consumers.

Read the rest of the post or learn more about the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau at ConsumerFinance.gov