News From Our Blog

mypubliclands:

Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area extends out from the Oregon coast, one mile into the Pacific Ocean. Standing 93 feet tall at the westernmost point of the basalt headland, the lighthouse has been a bright beacon of the night, guiding ships and their supplies along the west coast since the light was first lit on August 20, 1873.

The offshore islands are a year-round refuge for harbor seals and a spring-summer home for thousands of nesting seabirds. Gray whales can be spotted during their annual migrations to Mexico (late fall-early winter) and Alaska (late winter-early spring). During the summer months some gray whales take the opportunity to feed in the shallow waters around the headland.

Learn more: http://on.doi.gov/1lZfhcC

Photos: Bob Wick, BLM-California

Image Description: Grand Canyon just before sunset from Verkamp’s Visitor Center on the South Rim.  
National Park Service photo by Michael Quinn.

Image Description: Grand Canyon just before sunset from Verkamp’s Visitor Center on the South Rim.  

National Park Service photo by Michael Quinn.

Image description: USGS hydrologic technician Bob Reaves collects streamflow measurements from the cableway at the USGS streamgage on the Snake River near Moran, WY. 
Photo from the U.S. Geological Survey

Image description: USGS hydrologic technician Bob Reaves collects streamflow measurements from the cableway at the USGS streamgage on the Snake River near Moran, WY. 


Photo from the U.S. Geological Survey

Image description: If you need to think warm thoughts today, check out this gorgeous sunset over the water in Key West, Fla., courtesy of the National Weather Service.

Image description: If you need to think warm thoughts today, check out this gorgeous sunset over the water in Key West, Fla., courtesy of the National Weather Service.

Image description:
From the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service:

Talk about covering a lot of ground …
Meet Ben Lanford, our only full-time federal wildlife officer in the entire state of New Mexico. 
He’s the primary officer for Bosque del Apache, Sevilleta, Las Vegas, Maxwell, Rio Mora, San Andres and Valle de Oro Refuges. That’s roughly 400,000 acres of refuge land in a 160,000–square–mile territory!
Although he doesn’t do it alone, this 27–year–old New Mexico native does have to act as a jack of all trades sometimes.
Read more about his work and what inspired him to come work with us: http://1.usa.gov/1fdsWyO
Photo: Most of federal wildlife officer Ben Lanford’s work involves game warden duties, but he regularly does narcotics enforcement, too. (USFWS)

Image description:

From the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service:

Talk about covering a lot of ground …

Meet Ben Lanford, our only full-time federal wildlife officer in the entire state of New Mexico. 

He’s the primary officer for Bosque del Apache, Sevilleta, Las Vegas, Maxwell, Rio Mora, San Andres and Valle de Oro Refuges. That’s roughly 400,000 acres of refuge land in a 160,000–square–mile territory!

Although he doesn’t do it alone, this 27–year–old New Mexico native does have to act as a jack of all trades sometimes.

Read more about his work and what inspired him to come work with us: http://1.usa.gov/1fdsWyO

Photo: Most of federal wildlife officer Ben Lanford’s work involves game warden duties, but he regularly does narcotics enforcement, too. (USFWS)