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Image description: This photo of the moon’s north polar region was taken by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera, or LROC. One of the primary scientific objectives of LROC is to identify regions of permanent shadow and near-permanent illumination. Since the start of the mission, LROC has acquired thousands of wide angle camera images and combined them to produced this mosaic, which is composed of 983 images taken over a one month period during northern summer. 
Image courtesy of NASA

Image description: This photo of the moon’s north polar region was taken by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera, or LROC. One of the primary scientific objectives of LROC is to identify regions of permanent shadow and near-permanent illumination. Since the start of the mission, LROC has acquired thousands of wide angle camera images and combined them to produced this mosaic, which is composed of 983 images taken over a one month period during northern summer. 

Image courtesy of NASA

From the U.S. Presidential Libraries:

First moon walk.  July 20, 1969. 
Photo of Astronaut Edwin E.  “Buzz” Aldrin on the surface of the moon, next to the U.S. flag.  Photographed by Neil Armstrong, first person to set foot on the moon.  Apollo 11 mission.
-via The National Archives, Nixon Administration

From the U.S. Presidential Libraries:

First moon walk.  July 20, 1969. 

Photo of Astronaut Edwin E.  “Buzz” Aldrin on the surface of the moon, next to the U.S. flag.  Photographed by Neil Armstrong, first person to set foot on the moon.  Apollo 11 mission.

-via The National Archives, Nixon Administration

42 years ago today, two Americans became the first humans to walk on the moon. Watch restored video of their feat.

Image description from NASA:
The full moon is seen as it rises near the Lincoln Memorial, Saturday, March 19, 2011, in Washington.
Did you see the “supermoon” on Saturday?
Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

Image description from NASA:

The full moon is seen as it rises near the Lincoln Memorial, Saturday, March 19, 2011, in Washington.

Did you see the “supermoon” on Saturday?

Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls