News From Our Blog

Image description:  An Afghan girl watches as a U.S. Marine gives her sister cough suppressant in Herat province, Afghanistan. Coalition forces hold a bi-weekly clinic for women and children in area villages to receive treatment and standard hygiene products. 
U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Pete Thibodeau.

Image description:  An Afghan girl watches as a U.S. Marine gives her sister cough suppressant in Herat province, Afghanistan. Coalition forces hold a bi-weekly clinic for women and children in area villages to receive treatment and standard hygiene products.

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Pete Thibodeau.

Double-Arm Transplant Helps Iraqi Vet

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Image description: A team of surgeons at Johns Hopkins performs the hospital’s first double-arm transplant on former infantryman Brendan Marrocco. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army.

Former infantryman Brendan Marrocco lost both his arms and legs while serving in Iraq. However, after a successful double-arm transplant surgery, Marrocco has two arms again.

The double-arm transplant was the first surgery of its kind performed at Johns Hopkins hospital in Baltimore, Md. A team of 16 surgeons performed the surgery, which lasted 13 hours.

The surgical team replaced Marrocco’s right arm with a donor arm. On his left side, where Marrocco still had an elbow, the team replaced his entire forearm with his own remaining tissue, said Dr. W.P. Andrew Lee, director of the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Johns Hopkins.

Marrocco is currently in intensive hand therapy which helps him learn how to move his fingers, wrists and elbow.

“One of my goals is to hand cycle a marathon,” Marrocco said, after his surgery. “I want to get the most out of these arms. And as goals come up, knock them down and absolutely take it as far as I can. I want to get to the point where I can be on my own and get back to enjoying my life.”

Learn more about Marrocco’s surgery.

Learn How to Avoid Fake Online Pharmacies

Ninety seven percent of online pharmacies don’t follow U.S. pharmacy laws. If you buy from one of these online pharmacies, you run a high risk of receiving counterfeit or substandard drugs. You also put your personal and financial information at risk.

Beware of an online pharmacy that show these signs of being fake:

  • Allows you to buy drugs without a prescription from your doctor
  • Offers deep discounts or cheap prices that seem too good to be true
  • Sends spam or unsolicited email offering cheap drugs
  • Is located outside of the United States
  • Is not licensed in the United States

Look for these signs of a safe online pharmacy:

  • Always requires a doctor’s prescription
  • Provides a physical address and telephone number in the United States
  • Offers a pharmacist to answer your questions
  • Has a license with your state board of pharmacy. Check to see if it does.

Learn more about buying safely from the Food and Drug Administration’s BeSafeRx campaign.

Learn how and where you can safely dispose of medications at a drop off site near you.