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THOMAS.gov, a service of the Library of Congress, shows all laws passed by the current Congress and lets you search for bills in the House and Senate. You can also see the top five bills of the week or current activity in Congress.

Asked by Anonymous

I got an email from someone who claimed that SB 1698 and HR 3166 was a bill that would allow US citizens to be stripped of their citizenship if they are "engaging in, or purposely and materially supporting, hostilities against the US," without trial. Is this true?

Senate bill 1698 and House of Representatives bill 3166 are both bills to create the “Enemy Expatriation Act.” The Senators and Representatives who introduced the bills are trying to make a change to an existing law, the Immigration and Nationality Act.

The Immigration and Nationality Act includes a list of reasons why a U.S. citizen or national could lose his or her nationality, such as serving in the armed forces of another nation. The bills’ sponsors are concerned that the Immigration and Nationality Act might not apply to terrorists. The proposed Enemy Expatriation Act would revoke a person’s U.S. nationality for “Purposefully and materially supporting hostilities against the United States.” 

The government cannot revoke a person’s U.S. citizenship against his or her wishes without a federal trial. The  Enemy Expatriation Act does not try to change this.

Both bills are in the early stages in the process of becoming a law. They are in committees, which is what happens after a bill is first introduced. Many bills never make it out of committee.

Stay updated on the status of S. 1698 and H.R. 3166, or read the text of the proposed legislation.

Asked by Anonymous

What new law was passed in the Senate

THOMAS.gov, a service of the Library of Congress, shows all laws passed by the current Congress or you can search for bills in the House and Senate. You can also see the top five bills of the week or current activity in Congress. 

Asked by Anonymous

Has legilation been enacted to ban use of cell phones while driving trucks

Yesterday, the National Transportation Safety Board unanimously voted to ban the use of portable electronic devices while driving, except in emergency situations, for all drivers. The National Transportation Safety Board can make recommendations, but cannot pass laws. Each state is responsible for passing its own laws about distracted driving.

Nine states, the District of Columbia, and the Virgin Islands already prohibit all drivers from using handheld cell phones while driving. Find our if your state has a distracted driving law.

Laws Regulating Cellphone Use in Cars Vary by State

In the last few years, many states have passed laws about how drivers can use cellphones while in their cars. Each state’s laws are slightly different. Here’s a general overview of what you need to know about cellphone use in cars.

  • Handheld Cell Phones: Nine states, Washington D.C. and the Virgin Islands prohibit all drivers from using handheld cell phones while driving. 
  • All Cell Phone Use: No state bans all cell phone use for all drivers, but many prohibit cell phone use by novice drivers and school bus drivers.
  • Text Messaging: 34 states, Washington D.C. and Guam ban text messaging for all drivers. Three states restrict school bus drivers from texting while driving.

Some states such as Maine, New Hampshire and Utah treat cell phone use and texting as part of a larger distracted driving issue. In Utah, cellphone use is an offense only if a driver is also committing some other moving violation (other than speeding).

Learn more about the laws in your state and find a full list of cellphone use laws in all states.