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From the National Archives:


"Stay off gobbledygook language."

Seventy years ago, there just wasn’t a suitable term for those brain-scalding, rage-inducing concoctions of grammar and syntax masquerading as language. Well, Mr. Maury Maverick came up with one:
"Gobbledygook."
Here is his memorandum to the staff of the federal agency he headed, the Smaller War Plants Corporation; the first known usage of this faintly exotic, yet viciously accurate, addition to the English language.  

Memorandum from Maury Maverick to Everybody in Smaller War Plants Corporation. 3/24/1944
From the series: Field Letters and Memoranda, 1943 - 1945. Records of the Smaller War Plants Corporation, 1940 - 1948

(Today’s post comes via Alan Walker, an archivist in Research Services at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland.)
These days Mr. Maverick would just be seen as a rather outspoken proponent of what we in the government call “plain language.”
Maybe you call it “jargon,”  ”legalese,” or  ”doublespeak” —  what’s your favorite term for “Gobbledygook”?

Image description

From the National Archives:

"Stay off gobbledygook language."

Seventy years ago, there just wasn’t a suitable term for those brain-scalding, rage-inducing concoctions of grammar and syntax masquerading as language. Well, Mr. Maury Maverick came up with one:

"Gobbledygook."

Here is his memorandum to the staff of the federal agency he headed, the Smaller War Plants Corporation; the first known usage of this faintly exotic, yet viciously accurate, addition to the English language.  

Memorandum from Maury Maverick to Everybody in Smaller War Plants Corporation. 3/24/1944

From the series: Field Letters and Memoranda, 1943 - 1945. Records of the Smaller War Plants Corporation, 1940 - 1948

(Today’s post comes via Alan Walker, an archivist in Research Services at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland.)

These days Mr. Maverick would just be seen as a rather outspoken proponent of what we in the government call “plain language.

Maybe you call it “jargon,”  ”legalese,” or  ”doublespeak” —  what’s your favorite term for “Gobbledygook”?

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