News From Our Blog

Image description: We know convincing your kids to eat their fruits and veggies can sometimes be a challenge. But it doesn’t always have to be! 
Join Kids.gov for a Twitter chat on Wednesday, March 5 at 1 p.m. ET to get healthy-eating tips for your kids!
Follow @Kidsgov on Twitter and use the hashtag #NNMforkids.
You can also ask questions on Facebook and Twitter in advance that we’ll answer during the live event.

Image description: We know convincing your kids to eat their fruits and veggies can sometimes be a challenge. But it doesn’t always have to be! 

Join Kids.gov for a Twitter chat on Wednesday, March 5 at 1 p.m. ET to get healthy-eating tips for your kids!

Follow @Kidsgov on Twitter and use the hashtag #NNMforkids.

You can also ask questions on Facebook and Twitter in advance that we’ll answer during the live event.

Easy Tips to Manage Your Children’s Health

Keeping your kids healthy is one of your top priorities as a parent, but it’s not always an easy task. Between staying on top of their normal checkups and trying to get them to wash their hands before dinner, there are a lot of things that could slip through the cracks. Use these tips from we rounded up from across the government to make managing your kids’ health a little easier.

Stay up-to-date with your children’s immunizations and developmental milestones with an easy tracking chart you can download for free from Publications.USA.gov. It reminds you of all the necessary immunizations from infancy through age six. It also highlights developmental milestones—like recognizing a caregiver’s voice and learning to talk—that you can monitor as your children grow up.

If you’re struggling to pay for health insurance for your kids, they may be eligible for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). CHIP offers free or low-cost medical coverage for kids up to 19 years old. Coverage for eligible children includes checkups, hospital visits, dental coverage, immunizations and more. Find out if they’re eligible at InsureKidsNow.gov/chip.

Sometimes your kids don’t want to listen to mom or dad, but you want them to get information from a trusted source. Point them to the health resources on Kids.gov, where they can learn about everything from keeping their eyes safe to understanding germs and where they can play fun games that drive home the importance of brushing their teeth or getting their shots.

Find more free guides on managing your children’s health from infant to teen at Publications.USA.gov.

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From Stopbullying.gov:


Kids may be less likely to report bullying as they grow older. Try these tips for keeping the lines of communication open: http://1.usa.gov/xmLj1v

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From Stopbullying.gov:

Kids may be less likely to report bullying as they grow older. Try these tips for keeping the lines of communication open: http://1.usa.gov/xmLj1v

Image description: How much will that little bundle of joy cost? According to USDA’s Cost of Raising a Child report, the answer for a child born in 2012 is $241,080 for food, shelter and other necessities over the next 17 years.
Use the interactive calculator to find out how much it will cost you to raise kids.
Infographic from the USDA.

Image description: How much will that little bundle of joy cost? According to USDA’s Cost of Raising a Child report, the answer for a child born in 2012 is $241,080 for food, shelter and other necessities over the next 17 years.

Use the interactive calculator to find out how much it will cost you to raise kids.

Infographic from the USDA.

Helping parents get ready for back-to-school

Summer is a time when routines and schedules go out the window, days are usually carefree and bedtimes are pushed back. But those relaxing days can make transitioning back to school difficult for both parents and students.

With some advance planning, however, the switch from summer to fall doesn’t have to hurt quite as much. There are some good resources for going back to school and you can also follow these easy tips:

Set sleep habits: Ease the transition back to early mornings by implementing a bedtime. Getting enough sleep is important for school performance. If your child stays up late in the summer, start setting back the bedtime in small increments until it’s back where you want it. Setting it back slowly will make early school hours easier to handle.

Study space: Create a specific place in the house for students to do homework, whether it’s at the kitchen table or in a room, and make sure there’s plenty of light and that it’s free from distractions. Set a consistent time for them to work, before dinner or right after school, so it becomes part of their daily routine.

Stay healthy: Kids tend to be more active in the summer. You can keep those habits going during the school year by adding physical activity to family time. Instead of watching TV or playing video games after dinner, try a sunset stroll. Maybe even sign up and train for a charity walk. It’s also important to pack a healthy lunch filled with protein, fruits, vegetables and water.

Schedule help: Before the year begins, figure out who will drop-off and pick-up your child each day and keep a calendar to remind yourself of after-school activities and special events. If your child needs help with homework or school projects, set aside library time or sign up for after-school tutoring. And be sure to keep an open dialogue with your child’s teacher so there won’t be any surprises about work expectations.

Spend less: Buying new clothes and school supplies can be stressful on your budget. You can save money by recycling certain supplies. Hunt for deals online, where you can find discounted prices on everything from uniforms to lined paper.

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