News From Our Blog

Image description: According to the Centers for Disease Control, colorectal cancer is the second leading cancer killer among men and women in the United States, after lung cancer. But about 1 in 3 adults is not getting screened for colorectal cancer as recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). 
This infographic helps you pick the right screening test for you. 
You can find the full text of this graphic from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Image description: According to the Centers for Disease Control, colorectal cancer is the second leading cancer killer among men and women in the United States, after lung cancer. But about 1 in 3 adults is not getting screened for colorectal cancer as recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). 

This infographic helps you pick the right screening test for you. 

You can find the full text of this graphic from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For Your Health: Test Your Home for Radon

Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States and is estimated to be responsible for 15,000-22,000 lung cancer deaths each year. 

You can’t see, smell, or taste radon. It’s a radioactive gas that comes from the natural breakdown of the elements uranium, thorium, and radium in soil and rock. 

Radon can be present in both outdoor and indoor air, but you’re likely to get most exposure in your own home. 

To help protect your health, you can test your home for radon and take measures to lower radon levels if needed.

Image description: Technology today lets doctors get a pretty good look at our hearts. Check out all the ways they look at our tickers. 
Photo from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

Image description: Technology today lets doctors get a pretty good look at our hearts. Check out all the ways they look at our tickers. 

Photo from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

Image description: When there is too much cholesterol—a fat-like substance—in your blood, it builds up in the walls of your arteries and increases your risk of developing heart disease. Know your total cholesterol, your LDL (bad) cholesterol, and you’re your HDL (good) cholesterol, and triglycerides. Make an appointment to get tested.
Learn more at HeartTruth.gov and order FREE publications to help keep your heart healthy.

Image description: When there is too much cholesterol—a fat-like substance—in your blood, it builds up in the walls of your arteries and increases your risk of developing heart disease. Know your total cholesterol, your LDL (bad) cholesterol, and you’re your HDL (good) cholesterol, and triglycerides. Make an appointment to get tested.

Learn more at HeartTruth.gov and order FREE publications to help keep your heart healthy.

Today is Wear Red Day to promote awareness about heart disease. Order our FREE publications to get tips on protecting your heart health today and all year long