News From Our Blog

Image description: A scientist from the Minerals Management Service surveys the German U-boat U-701 during the Battle of the Atlantic Expedition Summer 2008 off the coast of North Carolina. 
The 2008 summer expedition was the first part of a larger multi-year project to research and document a number of historically significant shipwrecks tragically lost during WWII. The project is dedicated to raising awareness of the war that was fought so close to the American coastline and to preserving our nation’s maritime history.
Photo from NOAA.

Image description: A scientist from the Minerals Management Service surveys the German U-boat U-701 during the Battle of the Atlantic Expedition Summer 2008 off the coast of North Carolina.

The 2008 summer expedition was the first part of a larger multi-year project to research and document a number of historically significant shipwrecks tragically lost during WWII. The project is dedicated to raising awareness of the war that was fought so close to the American coastline and to preserving our nation’s maritime history.

Photo from NOAA.

Image description: Meet and talk with scientists, weather forecasters and hurricane hunter pilots and others who work to understand our environment, protect life and property, and conserve and protect natural resources at NOAA’s open house.
The event will be Saturday, Feb. 15, at NOAA’s location in Silver Spring, Md. 
There will be free activities, including engaging guest presentations, interactive exhibits, and hands-on activities for ages 5 and up, and early birds get a chance to take a tour of the National Weather Service’s Operations Center and NOAA Exploration Command Center.   
Find more details.

Image description: Meet and talk with scientists, weather forecasters and hurricane hunter pilots and others who work to understand our environment, protect life and property, and conserve and protect natural resources at NOAA’s open house.

The event will be Saturday, Feb. 15, at NOAA’s location in Silver Spring, Md. 

There will be free activities, including engaging guest presentations, interactive exhibits, and hands-on activities for ages 5 and up, and early birds get a chance to take a tour of the National Weather Service’s Operations Center and NOAA Exploration Command Center.   

Find more details.

Happy Birthday, Curiosity!

Video description

NASA’s Curiosity rover celebrated its Martian birthday on August 5 (PDT), the day that it landed on Mars. In honor of this special ocassion, engineers at Goddard Space Flight Center used the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument to “sing” Happy Birthday to Curiosity.

You can help Curiosity celebrate its first birthday too by sending it a postcard, learning about landing on Mars and more.

Video transcript

My name is Florence Tan, I’m the SAM Electrical Lead Engineer, I work at Goddard Space Flight Center. SAM stands for Sample Analysis at Mars. It is an organic chemistry lab on the Curiosity rover, it is the most well-equipped chemistry lab that we’ve sent to Mars to date.

Curiosity landed on Mars on August 5, 2012. It was born on Mars that day, and so we consider that day as its birthday.

We’re here at the test bed lab where SAM was built. It is an identical unit to the unit on Mars, and we use this unit to test our experiments before it is transmitted to Mars.

SAM will be running some great science experiments on Mars, we will be analyzing some soil samples. To make the soil samples go down, we have to program it to vibrate at various frequencies. When we’re introducing a sample into SAM, it will go through a resonance and it will sound like this.

[ electronic tone ]

To commemorate SAM’s birthday and Curiosity’s birthday on Mars, we decided to play a little song. If there’s anyone listening on Mars on this special occasion, you will hear this.

[ Happy Birthday to You ]

It’s really neat, and it’s exciting! This is a first for NASA and for the world, and music brings us all together so this is fun!

It’s been a great year on Mars and I cannot wait to get to Mount Sharp next year. We’ve discovered so many new things, and there’s still lots more discoveries to come.

From the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration:

This stream provides a live view of the video feed coming from the Okeanos Explorer as it explores sites of interest in the vicinity of the Galápagos Rift. The feed includes ROV video from the seafloor, audio narration by scientists on and off the ship, and real-time sonar, CTD, and navigation displays that assist the scientists in their work.

This unique expedition, to one of the most fascinating areas of the world’s ocean, will explore diverse deep sea habitats on seamounts and hydrothermal vent systems in the Galápagos region.

The Okeanos Explorer can discover interesting seafloor features with the deep water multibeam sonar mapping system. In addition, the ship has a dedicated Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV), which can travel down to a depth of 4,000 meters. High-definition video from the ROV and camera platform are sent to the ship and to shore in real-time, a technology referred to as “telepresence.” Although the Okeanos Explorer may be thousands of miles away, the scientists standing watch at shore side exploration “command centers” throughout the country will be able to guide the ship through its mission, and help enable seafloor images and video to stream live into classrooms, newsrooms, and living rooms through high speed internet.