News From Our Blog

Image description: A Southern Resident killer whale mom and her calf swim in the ocean. The Southern Resident whale communities are mostly found in the North Pacific ocean and are the only killer whales listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Photo from  NOAA.

Image description: A Southern Resident killer whale mom and her calf swim in the ocean. The Southern Resident whale communities are mostly found in the North Pacific ocean and are the only killer whales listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Photo from  NOAA.

Image description
From the Department of Interior:

We had to share this very unique photo and story from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services Endangered Species Program on their efforts to bring back this endangered amphibian.This Wyoming toad has been outfitted with a backpack containing a radio transmitter to help biologists track it in the wild. The Wyoming toad, now the most endangered amphibian in North America, once flourished in the wetlands and rivers of southeastern Wyoming. See what’s being done to bring this species back from the brink: http://1.usa.gov/16jQ9IL

Image description

From the Department of Interior:

We had to share this very unique photo and story from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services Endangered Species Program on their efforts to bring back this endangered amphibian.

This Wyoming toad has been outfitted with a backpack containing a radio transmitter to help biologists track it in the wild. The Wyoming toad, now the most endangered amphibian in North America, once flourished in the wetlands and rivers of southeastern Wyoming. See what’s being done to bring this species back from the brink: http://1.usa.gov/16jQ9IL

Great Lakes Wolf No Longer on Endangered List

Gray wolf populations in the Great Lakes region have recovered and no longer require the protection of the Endangered Species Act. Wolves in Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin and in portions of adjoining states, will be dropped from the list of endangered and threatened wildlife and plants.

With more than 4,000 wolves thriving in the region, the program has surpassed its recovery goal, and the wolves have made a successful comeback. The wolves no longer need federal protection.

Learn more about the Great Lakes Wolves and Endangered Species Program.