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Image description: The size and overall distribution of the U.S. population has changed over time, as some states – especially those in the South and West – have grown faster than others. This series of cartograms shows the distribution of the population in 1890, 1950, and 2010. A cartogram is a map that represents the size of geographic units by a statistic such as population count instead of by actual land area. In each cartogram shown here, one square represents 50,000 people.
From the U.S. Census Bureau’s Data Visualization Gallery.

Image description: The size and overall distribution of the U.S. population has changed over time, as some states – especially those in the South and West – have grown faster than others. This series of cartograms shows the distribution of the population in 1890, 1950, and 2010. A cartogram is a map that represents the size of geographic units by a statistic such as population count instead of by actual land area. In each cartogram shown here, one square represents 50,000 people.

From the U.S. Census Bureau’s Data Visualization Gallery.

Image description:
From NOAA Visualizations:

A drop in the jet stream sent temperatures across the United States plummeting over the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday weekend. The pronounced change in temperatures can be seen in this weather data from NOAA/NCEP’s Real-Time Mesoscale Analysis. Areas colored blue are below freezing. The diurnal cycle of heating and cooling can be seen over time, but the pattern is clear: much of the U.S. is pretty cold.

Image description:

From NOAA Visualizations:

A drop in the jet stream sent temperatures across the United States plummeting over the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday weekend. The pronounced change in temperatures can be seen in this weather data from NOAA/NCEP’s Real-Time Mesoscale Analysis. Areas colored blue are below freezing. The diurnal cycle of heating and cooling can be seen over time, but the pattern is clear: much of the U.S. is pretty cold.
Image description: Nathan Yau, from the blog Flowing Data, created this image based on data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Association. It reveals that fatal car accidents are more likely to occur on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays and that fewer fatal accidents occur during winter months, which is attributable to the fact that people drive fewer miles in winter months.
Learn more about safe driving.

Image description: Nathan Yau, from the blog Flowing Data, created this image based on data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Association. It reveals that fatal car accidents are more likely to occur on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays and that fewer fatal accidents occur during winter months, which is attributable to the fact that people drive fewer miles in winter months.

Learn more about safe driving.