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FBI Reports 5.5% Decrease in Violent Crime in 2010

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) released its Preliminary Annual Uniform Crime Report for 2010 today. According to the report, the number of violent crimes decreased 5.5% and the number of property crimes decreased 2.8% in 2010 when compared with data from 2009.

A few key findings from the report:

  • Violent crime declined in all city groups. Cities with populations of 250,000 to 499,999 saw the greatest decline in violent crime (6.9 percent). Violent crime in non-metropolitan counties decreased 6.4 percent, and in metropolitan counties, it declined 6.0 percent.
  • Violent crime decreased in all four regions of the country in 2010. There was a 7.5 percent decrease in violent crime in the South, a 5.9 decline in the Midwest, a 5.8 percent decrease in the West, and a 0.4 percent decline in the Northeast.
  • All property crime offense categories—burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft—decreased in 2010 when compared with 2009 data. Motor vehicle theft showed the largest drop (7.2 percent), followed by larceny-theft, which decreased 2.8 percent, and burglary, which declined 1.1 percent.

You can read more findings from the report on FBI.gov, and click here to download the raw data used in the report.

On June 30, 1999, sheriff’s officers in St. Louis, Missouri discovered the body of 41-year-old Ricky McCormick. He had been murdered and dumped in a field. The only clues regarding the homicide were two encrypted notes found in the victim’s pants pockets.
Despite extensive work by our Cryptanalysis and Racketeering Records Unit (CRRU), as well as help from the American Cryptogram Association, the meanings of those two coded notes remain a mystery to this day, and Ricky McCormick’s murderer has yet to face justice…
McCormick was a high school dropout, but he was able to read and write and was said to be “street smart.” According to members of his family, McCormick had used such encrypted notes since he was a boy, but apparently no one in his family knows how to decipher the codes, and it’s unknown whether anyone besides McCormick could translate his secret language.

The FBI can use your help to decipher these notes. Visit the FBI’s page about Ricky McCormick’s case to see the two notes and learn how you can help the FBI break the code.

Image description: One of the coded notes found in Ricky McCormick’s pockets, including a variety of letters, numbers, dashes, and parentheses.
On June 30, 1999, sheriff’s officers in St. Louis, Missouri discovered the body of 41-year-old Ricky McCormick. He had been murdered and dumped in a field. The only clues regarding the homicide were two encrypted notes found in the victim’s pants pockets.

Despite extensive work by our Cryptanalysis and Racketeering Records Unit (CRRU), as well as help from the American Cryptogram Association, the meanings of those two coded notes remain a mystery to this day, and Ricky McCormick’s murderer has yet to face justice…

McCormick was a high school dropout, but he was able to read and write and was said to be “street smart.” According to members of his family, McCormick had used such encrypted notes since he was a boy, but apparently no one in his family knows how to decipher the codes, and it’s unknown whether anyone besides McCormick could translate his secret language.

The FBI can use your help to decipher these notes. Visit the FBI’s page about Ricky McCormick’s case to see the two notes and learn how you can help the FBI break the code.



Image description: One of the coded notes found in Ricky McCormick’s pockets, including a variety of letters, numbers, dashes, and parentheses.