News From Our Blog

Will You Join Us and Commit to Protect the Climate?

By Jessica Orquina, Social Media Lead, Environmental Protection Agency

 April 22 is Earth Day, and here at EPA we celebrate all month. Carbon pollution is causing the temperature of our planet to rise, and this is affecting people around the globe. Together, though, we can make a difference.

Did you know that driving your car, using electricity to light and heat your home, and throwing away garbage all lead to greenhouse gas emissions? Here are some small things you can do on Earth Day, and through the month of April, to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fight climate change.

  • Check out our #ActOnClimate 30 Tips for Earth Month. Every day, we’ll be sharing a new tip on Facebook, Twitter, our blog, Google+, Flickr, Pinterest, and Instagram. Follow our accounts to see the tips, or you can see all the tips on our Earth Day website. Please share the tips with your family and friends!
  • Join our Thunderclap: On Earth Day, #ActOnClimate. Thunderclap is a system that lets people share the same message at the same time via their social media accounts. We’re using it to share a message on Earth Day about the small actions we all can take to act on climate change. Commit to protecting our climate by joining our Thunderclap and also by helping us get the word out about the Thunderclap.
  • Join our Earth Month Twitter chats. Throughout the month of April, we’ll be hosting Twitter chats about climate change with experts from across EPA. Chat topics and schedule.
  • Attend an Earth Day event. We’ve got a list of events across the country.

Happy Earth Day, and thank you for helping protect our climate!

Image description: The National Museum of American History recently received a donation of more than 20 Jim Henson puppets and props from the Henson family.

The Museum’s conservation lab had to work on the puppets to get them ready for the donation ceremony. Some of the puppets are the originals and the materials used in their original creation were not meant to last for decades.

Learn more about conserving these beloved puppets. You can also view more photos from the lab.

Image description: Explore the J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge without ever leaving your home on Wednesday, June 5 from 1 to 2 p.m. ET.
Discovery Education is presenting a virtual field trip live from Sanibel Island, FL. The refuge is part of the largest undeveloped mangrove ecosystem in the United States, and is famous for its migratory bird populations.
Learn more about the event and sign up to reserve your spot on the “trip.”
Photo from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services

Image description: Explore the J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge without ever leaving your home on Wednesday, June 5 from 1 to 2 p.m. ET.

Discovery Education is presenting a virtual field trip live from Sanibel Island, FL. The refuge is part of the largest undeveloped mangrove ecosystem in the United States, and is famous for its migratory bird populations.

Learn more about the event and sign up to reserve your spot on the “trip.

Photo from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services

Image description: A Fish and Wildlife Conservation biologist examines the mouth of a young Kemp’s ridley sea turtle for any evidence of oil or tar in the mouth, which would indicate that the turtle has ingested oil. Turtles may ingest oil by feeding on oiled prey or by eating tar balls.
FWC biologists and other rescue workers are searching for oil-impacted sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico to assess the extent of the damage from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.
The rescue workers’ main goal is to find and rehabilitate as many of the oil-impacted sea turtles as possible.
Learn more about the efforts to help the effected sea turtles.
Photo by Fish and Wildlife Research Institute.

Image description: A Fish and Wildlife Conservation biologist examines the mouth of a young Kemp’s ridley sea turtle for any evidence of oil or tar in the mouth, which would indicate that the turtle has ingested oil. Turtles may ingest oil by feeding on oiled prey or by eating tar balls.

FWC biologists and other rescue workers are searching for oil-impacted sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico to assess the extent of the damage from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

The rescue workers’ main goal is to find and rehabilitate as many of the oil-impacted sea turtles as possible.

Learn more about the efforts to help the effected sea turtles.

Photo by Fish and Wildlife Research Institute.

Find Ways To Conserve Energy This Month

This October is Energy Awareness Month, and it is a good time to go over your energy routine and think of ways to conserve energy in your home and daily life.

Pay attention to the energy use in your home so you can monitor how much you are using. Simply unplugging some large energy consumers when they are not in use, such as home entertainment systems, and turning off lights when you leave a room, can save you money on your utility bill each month.

Stay up-to-date on new appliances and technologies that save energy and money, so that when it comes time to replace something, you know the most energy friendly options. You can find information on energy efficient appliances at EnergyStar.gov.

You can also help your kids understand the importance of energy conservation by teaching them how they can make a difference and why it is important to care about preserving our planet. Energy Star Kids is a fun, interactive, and educational tool your kids can explore.

Learn more about energy awareness and how to save.