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From the National Archives:

Police Report on Arrest of Rosa Parks
On December 1, 1955, during a typical evening rush hour in Montgomery, Alabama, a 42 year-old woman took a seat near the front of the bus on her way home from the Montgomery Fair department store where she worked as a seamstress. Refusing to yield her seat to a white passenger when instructed by the bus driver, police were called and she was arrested.
The police report shows that Rosa Parks was charged with “refusing to obey orders of bus driver.” According to the report, she was taken to the police station, where she was booked, fingerprinted, and briefly incarcerated.
The event touched off a 381-day boycott of the Montgomery, Alabama, bus system in which a 26-year-old unknown minister, Martin Luther King, Jr., emerged as the leader.
(more via DocsTeach)

Image description:

From the National Archives:

Police Report on Arrest of Rosa Parks

On December 1, 1955, during a typical evening rush hour in Montgomery, Alabama, a 42 year-old woman took a seat near the front of the bus on her way home from the Montgomery Fair department store where she worked as a seamstress. Refusing to yield her seat to a white passenger when instructed by the bus driver, police were called and she was arrested.

The police report shows that Rosa Parks was charged with “refusing to obey orders of bus driver.” According to the report, she was taken to the police station, where she was booked, fingerprinted, and briefly incarcerated.

The event touched off a 381-day boycott of the Montgomery, Alabama, bus system in which a 26-year-old unknown minister, Martin Luther King, Jr., emerged as the leader.

(more via DocsTeach)

Image description: On February 27, a statue of Rosa Parks commissioned by Congress was unveiled in National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol, approximately 100 years after her birth on February 4, 1913.
Rosa Parks, whose arrest in 1955 for refusing to yield her seat on a segregated bus to a white passenger, helped ignite the modern American civil rights movement. This bronze statue shows Parks seated on a rock-like formation of which she seems almost a part, symbolizing her famous refusal to give up her bus seat. 
Photo from the Architect of the Capitol

Image description: On February 27, a statue of Rosa Parks commissioned by Congress was unveiled in National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol, approximately 100 years after her birth on February 4, 1913.

Rosa Parks, whose arrest in 1955 for refusing to yield her seat on a segregated bus to a white passenger, helped ignite the modern American civil rights movement. This bronze statue shows Parks seated on a rock-like formation of which she seems almost a part, symbolizing her famous refusal to give up her bus seat. 

Photo from the Architect of the Capitol

Image description: This picture was taken at the Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. on August 28, 1963. It shows Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., president of the  Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and Mathew Ahmann, Executive Director of the National Catholic Conference for Interrracial Justice, in the crowd.
The march was one of the largest political rallies for human rights in U.S. history, and it was where Dr. King delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech.
Photo from the National Archives.

Image description: This picture was taken at the Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. on August 28, 1963. It shows Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and Mathew Ahmann, Executive Director of the National Catholic Conference for Interrracial Justice, in the crowd.

The march was one of the largest political rallies for human rights in U.S. history, and it was where Dr. King delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech.

Photo from the National Archives.

In honor of these two, learn about your civil rights.