News From Our Blog

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From the Department of Interior:

Here they come… welcome the first bison calves of 2014 to the National Bison Range Refuge in Montana! Weighing in at 40-50 pounds, these wee ones will stay red for a few months before turning brown. By the time we see them at the annual roundup in October, most will weigh between 250-350 pounds.

Photo: USFWS

Baby Panda Gets a Bath

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From the Smithsonian:

Two-and-a-half weeks old giant panda gets a tongue bath (by Smithsonian’s National Zoo)

Image description: A baby panda was born Friday, August 23, at Smithsonian’s National Zoo in Washington, D.C.
The baby cub weighed in at 4.8 ounces. During the cub’s first exam on Sunday, veterinarians observed the cub was breathing normally and was having no problems with eating or digestion.  
The panda cub’s sex and paternity won’t be known for another few weeks.

Image description: A baby panda was born Friday, August 23, at Smithsonian’s National Zoo in Washington, D.C.

The baby cub weighed in at 4.8 ounces. During the cub’s first exam on Sunday, veterinarians observed the cub was breathing normally and was having no problems with eating or digestion. 

The panda cub’s sex and paternity won’t be known for another few weeks.

Image description: The National Zoo welcomed two baby Sumatran tiger cubs on Monday! These tigers are critically endangered in the wild, so the births are a step toward conservation efforts. 
The Zoo is giving Mom and babies time to bond, and they most likely won’t be on exhibit at the Zoo until the late fall. In the meantime, you can watch them grow on the Zoo’s tiger cub cams. 
Read all about the cubs and the births.  Photo from the National Zoo.

Image description: The National Zoo welcomed two baby Sumatran tiger cubs on Monday! These tigers are critically endangered in the wild, so the births are a step toward conservation efforts. 

The Zoo is giving Mom and babies time to bond, and they most likely won’t be on exhibit at the Zoo until the late fall. In the meantime, you can watch them grow on the Zoo’s tiger cub cams. 

Read all about the cubs and the births 

Photo from the National Zoo.