News From Our Blog

Image description: The sloth bear cub, Hank, recently made his public debut at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo. He is the first sloth bear born at the Zoo in seven years.

Hank and his mother, Hana, have spent the past six months in a den near the Asia Trail exhibit. Now that he is adept at climbing, the Zoo’s animal care staff are confident he can conquer the yard’s complex climbing structures and varied terrain.

Photo from Smithsonian’s National Zoo. View more photos of Hank.

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From the U.S. Department of Interior:

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced that the Buffalo Zoo, in Buffalo, New York is the planned destination, for the near future, for an orphaned polar bear cub found near Point Lay, Alaska, on March 12. The three-to-four month-old male, named Kali (pronounced cully - the Inupiat name for Point Lay), is currently receiving care at the Alaska Zoo but is expected to be safely transported to the Buffalo Zoo sometime this spring, pending final approvals and the health of the cub.Kali will be introduced to the Buffalo Zoo’s female polar bear cub, born on November 27, 2012. She is being hand-raised by the Zoo’s veterinary and keeper staff due to inadequate care by the cub’s mother, Anana. The orphaned cub’s planned journey from Point Lay to Buffalo is the product of collaboration among the Alaska Zoo, the Buffalo Zoo, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and the AZA’s Polar Bear Species Survival Plan® management group.
Read more. 

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From the U.S. Department of Interior:

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced that the Buffalo Zoo, in Buffalo, New York is the planned destination, for the near future, for an orphaned polar bear cub found near Point Lay, Alaska, on March 12. The three-to-four month-old male, named Kali (pronounced cully - the Inupiat name for Point Lay), is currently receiving care at the Alaska Zoo but is expected to be safely transported to the Buffalo Zoo sometime this spring, pending final approvals and the health of the cub.

Kali will be introduced to the Buffalo Zoo’s female polar bear cub, born on November 27, 2012. She is being hand-raised by the Zoo’s veterinary and keeper staff due to inadequate care by the cub’s mother, Anana. The orphaned cub’s planned journey from Point Lay to Buffalo is the product of collaboration among the Alaska Zoo, the Buffalo Zoo, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and the AZA’s Polar Bear Species Survival Plan® management group.

Read more

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From the Bureau of Land Management (BLM):


Nothing’s cuter than a baby burro.
See more burro pics on the Bureau of Land Management California Facebook page!


Learn more about BLM wild horse and burro program.

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From the Bureau of Land Management (BLM):

Learn more about BLM wild horse and burro program.

Image description: Electra, the National Zoo’s newest fishing cat mom, teaches her two babies how to fish for food.
Electra gave birth to the kittens on May 18. It was the first time fishing cats have been bred at the National Zoo.
Photo by the National Zoo.

Image description: Electra, the National Zoo’s newest fishing cat mom, teaches her two babies how to fish for food.

Electra gave birth to the kittens on May 18. It was the first time fishing cats have been bred at the National Zoo.

Photo by the National Zoo.

Image description: These four maned wolf pups were born in early January at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute. Maned wolves are considered near-threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, mainly due to habitat loss and conflict with humans. Learn more about the pups and the Smithsonian’s efforts to maintain them.
Photo by Lisa Ware, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute

Image description: These four maned wolf pups were born in early January at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute. Maned wolves are considered near-threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, mainly due to habitat loss and conflict with humans. Learn more about the pups and the Smithsonian’s efforts to maintain them.

Photo by Lisa Ware, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute