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Image description: A moment in time from the multi-media artwork “Electronic Superhighway: Continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii” by Nam June Paik in 1995. The 40 foot-long piece is constructed of 336 televisions, 50 DVD players, 3,750 feet of cable, and 575 feet of multi-color neon tubing.
According to the Smithsonian, Nam June Paik is hailed as the “father of video art” and credited with the first use of the term “information superhighway” in the 1970s. He recognized the potential for media collaboration among people in all parts of the world, and he knew that media would completely transform our lives.
Electronic Superhighway, currently on display at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, is a testament to the ways media defined one man’s understanding of a diverse nation.
Learn more about the piece and the artist (PDF document). For teachers, there is a curriculum based on the artwork.
Photo from the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Image description: A moment in time from the multi-media artwork “Electronic Superhighway: Continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii” by Nam June Paik in 1995. The 40 foot-long piece is constructed of 336 televisions, 50 DVD players, 3,750 feet of cable, and 575 feet of multi-color neon tubing.

According to the Smithsonian, Nam June Paik is hailed as the “father of video art” and credited with the first use of the term “information superhighway” in the 1970s. He recognized the potential for media collaboration among people in all parts of the world, and he knew that media would completely transform our lives.

Electronic Superhighway, currently on display at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, is a testament to the ways media defined one man’s understanding of a diverse nation.

Learn more about the piece and the artist (PDF document). For teachers, there is a curriculum based on the artwork.

Photo from the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Image description: This 1969 poster from Continental Airlines promoted travel to Hawaii. In the mid 1900s, airline advertisements encouraged travelers to visit exotic destinations.
The National Air and Space Museum has a collection of more than 1,300 posters that focus on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. View more posters in the Fly Now online exhibit.
Image from the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Image description: This 1969 poster from Continental Airlines promoted travel to Hawaii. In the mid 1900s, airline advertisements encouraged travelers to visit exotic destinations.

The National Air and Space Museum has a collection of more than 1,300 posters that focus on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. View more posters in the Fly Now online exhibit.

Image from the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Image description: This marble statue of Clio, the Muse of History, is displayed in the Capitol’s National Statuary Hall. It was created by Carlo Franzoni in 1819.
Photo from the Architect of the Capitol

Image description: This marble statue of Clio, the Muse of History, is displayed in the Capitol’s National Statuary Hall. It was created by Carlo Franzoni in 1819.

Photo from the Architect of the Capitol

Image description: This poster for the United States Travel Bureau promotes tourism. It was released in June 1938 as part of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) Federal Art Project.
View more WPA posters.
Image from the Library of Congress

Image description: This poster for the United States Travel Bureau promotes tourism. It was released in June 1938 as part of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) Federal Art Project.

View more WPA posters.

Image from the Library of Congress

Image description: Science can be art. A National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) calibration system used infrared laser light to precisely measure the thickness of 300 millimeter silicon wafer.
Photo by Q. Wang, U. Griesmann/NIST
Find more science as art images on Flickr.

Image description: Science can be art. A National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) calibration system used infrared laser light to precisely measure the thickness of 300 millimeter silicon wafer.

Photo by Q. Wang, U. Griesmann/NIST

Find more science as art images on Flickr.