News From Our Blog

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From the National Archives:

You can’t snuggle with the Constitution, but you can sleep next to it! This sleepover in the Rotunda is open to children, ages 8-12, who are accompanied by an adult. Registration fees are $125 per person (more information at http://www.archivesfoundation.org/sleepover/)
Participants get to meet author Brad Meltzer, who will set the way for an evening of historical missions and discovery. Learn to decode Civil War ciphers, write with a quill pen, dress up in period clothing, and play with historic toys and games from our patent collection.
Children will also get to meet journalist and author Cokie Roberts, and interact with historical characters Abraham Lincoln and Amelia Earhart. The evening wraps up with a selection of Oscar-nominated short films in the William G. McGowan Theater.
Participants will receive the first two books in Brad Meltzer’s brand new children’s series, I am Abraham Lincoln and I am Amelia Earhart. Written by Meltzer and illustrated by Christopher Eliopoulos, each book tells the real-life story of an ordinary person who changed the world.
To register, download the Sleepover Registration packet, and send the completed forms to sleepover@archivesfoundation.org.
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Image description:

From the National Archives:

You can’t snuggle with the Constitution, but you can sleep next to it! This sleepover in the Rotunda is open to children, ages 8-12, who are accompanied by an adult. Registration fees are $125 per person (more information at http://www.archivesfoundation.org/sleepover/)

Participants get to meet author Brad Meltzer, who will set the way for an evening of historical missions and discovery. Learn to decode Civil War ciphers, write with a quill pen, dress up in period clothing, and play with historic toys and games from our patent collection.

Children will also get to meet journalist and author Cokie Roberts, and interact with historical characters Abraham Lincoln and Amelia Earhart. The evening wraps up with a selection of Oscar-nominated short films in the William G. McGowan Theater.

Participants will receive the first two books in Brad Meltzer’s brand new children’s series, I am Abraham Lincoln and I am Amelia Earhart. Written by Meltzer and illustrated by Christopher Eliopoulos, each book tells the real-life story of an ordinary person who changed the world.

To register, download the Sleepover Registration packet, and send the completed forms to sleepover@archivesfoundation.org.


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From the National Archives:

Donna Judd spends each day carefully searching for valuable information for veterans in the documents left burned and brittle by the 1973 fire at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis.

She looks for separation documents so that veterans can get benefits, and she sifts through damaged files to find information for medals.

“One record could take 5 minutes, another record could take 5 hours,” she says.

To read the full story of how Donna helps veterans claim their benefits even when the files have been damaged, go to today’s blog post:
http://go.usa.gov/jrVA

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From the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library:

John F. Kennedy, Jr. sits in the pilot’s seat of the Presidential helicopter during a weekend trip to Camp David in Frederick County, Maryland.

View more photos from the trip.

Photo Credit: Robert Knudsen/JFK Library.

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From the National Archives:


Plan of Alcatraz Prison Towers at the Dock and Power House, 1940

Fifty years ago, the Federal penitentiary on Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay closed on March 21, 1963.  Acquired by the Department of Justice in 1933, the federal prison opened in 1934.  Over the course of its years in operation, the prison hosted such infamous figures as Al Capone, Robert Stroud (aka The Birdman), George “Machine Gun” Kelly, James “Whitey” Bulger, and Rafael Cancel Miranda.  These plans for prison towers at the dock and power house were part of the overall modernization of the prison facilities undertaken in 1940.

Image description:

From the National Archives:

Plan of Alcatraz Prison Towers at the Dock and Power House, 1940

Fifty years ago, the Federal penitentiary on Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay closed on March 21, 1963.  Acquired by the Department of Justice in 1933, the federal prison opened in 1934.  Over the course of its years in operation, the prison hosted such infamous figures as Al Capone, Robert Stroud (aka The Birdman), George “Machine Gun” Kelly, James “Whitey” Bulger, and Rafael Cancel Miranda.  These plans for prison towers at the dock and power house were part of the overall modernization of the prison facilities undertaken in 1940.

From the U.S. National Archives’ exhibit “What’s Cooking, Uncle Sam?”:

J-E-L-L—O! 
You might think that this is just an ordinary Jell-O box, but there is more to it than meets the eye. This particular box of raspberry Jell-O was used as evidence in the espionage trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg and Morton Sobell in 1951.
You can read more about the Rosenberg case and the tell-tale Jell-O box in Prologue: Pieces of History.

From the U.S. National Archives’ exhibit “What’s Cooking, Uncle Sam?”:

J-E-L-L—O!

You might think that this is just an ordinary Jell-O box, but there is more to it than meets the eye. This particular box of raspberry Jell-O was used as evidence in the espionage trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg and Morton Sobell in 1951.

You can read more about the Rosenberg case and the tell-tale Jell-O box in Prologue: Pieces of History.