News From Our Blog

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From the Department of Interior:

Here they come… welcome the first bison calves of 2014 to the National Bison Range Refuge in Montana! Weighing in at 40-50 pounds, these wee ones will stay red for a few months before turning brown. By the time we see them at the annual roundup in October, most will weigh between 250-350 pounds.

Photo: USFWS

Image description: Mom and baby sea turtle sleeping on the beach on the Big Island in Hawaii.
Photo from NOAA.

Image description: Mom and baby sea turtle sleeping on the beach on the Big Island in Hawaii.

Photo from NOAA.

Image description: A Southern Resident killer whale mom and her calf swim in the ocean. The Southern Resident whale communities are mostly found in the North Pacific ocean and are the only killer whales listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Photo from  NOAA.

Image description: A Southern Resident killer whale mom and her calf swim in the ocean. The Southern Resident whale communities are mostly found in the North Pacific ocean and are the only killer whales listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Photo from  NOAA.

Image description: USGS scientists examine thermal imagery of wolves for assessing impacts of sarcoptic mange on the survival, reproduction and social behavior of this species in Yellowstone National Park. 
Sarcoptic mange is a highly contagious canine skin disease, caused by mites that burrow into the skin causing infections, hair loss, severe irritation and an insatiable desire to scratch. The resulting hair loss and depressed vigor of an infected animal leaves them vulnerable to hypothermia, malnutrition and dehydration, which can eventually lead to death.
Note the bright red patch on the wolf’s hindquarters in this thermal image of a captive wolf at the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in West Yellowstone. This is where fur was shaved to replicate the loss of fur associated with sarcoptic mange. The fur will eventually grow back. All research animals are handled by following the specific requirements of USGS Animal Care and Use policies. Learn more at bit.ly/usgswolf.

Image description: USGS scientists examine thermal imagery of wolves for assessing impacts of sarcoptic mange on the survival, reproduction and social behavior of this species in Yellowstone National Park.

Sarcoptic mange is a highly contagious canine skin disease, caused by mites that burrow into the skin causing infections, hair loss, severe irritation and an insatiable desire to scratch. The resulting hair loss and depressed vigor of an infected animal leaves them vulnerable to hypothermia, malnutrition and dehydration, which can eventually lead to death.

Note the bright red patch on the wolf’s hindquarters in this thermal image of a captive wolf at the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in West Yellowstone. This is where fur was shaved to replicate the loss of fur associated with sarcoptic mange. The fur will eventually grow back. All research animals are handled by following the specific requirements of USGS Animal Care and Use policies. 

Learn more at bit.ly/usgswolf.

Image description: NOAA employees release a rehabilitated harbor seal named Hopper as part of the Marine Animal Rescue Program at the National Aquarium in Baltimore.
Photo from NOAA.

Image description: NOAA employees release a rehabilitated harbor seal named Hopper as part of the Marine Animal Rescue Program at the National Aquarium in Baltimore.

Photo from NOAA.