News From Our Blog

Image description: Yesterday, Dr. Li Desheng performed an artificial insemination on the female giant panda, Mei Xiang, at Smithsonian’s National Zoo in Washington, D.C.
Scientists and veterinarians decided to try artificial insemination on Mei Xiang, after she failed to get pregnant by the giant male panda, Tian Tian. Mei Xiang was under general anesthesia during the procedure.
In the coming months, scientists will monitor the panda’s hormone levels to determine if she is pregnant. The procedure was live tweeted on the The National Zoo’s twitter feed (@NationalZoo) using the hashtag #pandaAI.
Learn more about Mei Xiang’s procedure.
Photo from Smithsonian’s National Zoo

Image description: Yesterday, Dr. Li Desheng performed an artificial insemination on the female giant panda, Mei Xiang, at Smithsonian’s National Zoo in Washington, D.C.

Scientists and veterinarians decided to try artificial insemination on Mei Xiang, after she failed to get pregnant by the giant male panda, Tian Tian. Mei Xiang was under general anesthesia during the procedure.

In the coming months, scientists will monitor the panda’s hormone levels to determine if she is pregnant. The procedure was live tweeted on the The National Zoo’s twitter feed (@NationalZoo) using the hashtag #pandaAI.

Learn more about Mei Xiang’s procedure.

Photo from Smithsonian’s National Zoo

Image description: An X-ray image of a Viper Moray Eel from the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History exhibit “X-ray Vision: Fish Inside Out.” 
Featuring a reported max length of over 1.5 m, Moray eels are “sit-and-wait” predators. They often stick their head out of a rock crevice and wait for a fish to swim by. When the prey is close enough, the eel quickly attacks and then retreats back into the rock or coral.
The Smithsonian exhibit features images of undersea creatures taken for research purposes that are also visually striking. You can learn about the X-ray technique used by the researchers and view more pictures from the exhibit.

Image description: An X-ray image of a Viper Moray Eel from the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History exhibit “X-ray Vision: Fish Inside Out.” 

Featuring a reported max length of over 1.5 m, Moray eels are “sit-and-wait” predators. They often stick their head out of a rock crevice and wait for a fish to swim by. When the prey is close enough, the eel quickly attacks and then retreats back into the rock or coral.

The Smithsonian exhibit features images of undersea creatures taken for research purposes that are also visually striking. You can learn about the X-ray technique used by the researchers and view more pictures from the exhibit.

Image description: A Gray Wolf behind a fallen tree, taken at the Wildlife Science Center in Forest Lake, Minnesota, during the winter of 1998.  The Fish and Wildlife Service recently removed the Gray Wolf from the Endangered Species List in the Western Great Lakes Region.  Learn more about the successful recovery of this species.
Photo by Scott Flaherty, United States Fish and Wildlife Service.

Image description: A Gray Wolf behind a fallen tree, taken at the Wildlife Science Center in Forest Lake, Minnesota, during the winter of 1998. The Fish and Wildlife Service recently removed the Gray Wolf from the Endangered Species List in the Western Great Lakes Region. Learn more about the successful recovery of this species.

Photo by Scott Flaherty, United States Fish and Wildlife Service.