News From Our Blog

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From the National Archives:

“In Event of Moon Disaster”, July 18, 1969.

White House speechwriter, William Safire, was asked to write a speech that President Nixon would make in case the Apollo 11 astronauts were stranded on the Moon.

It was never delivered, and this speech was quietly tucked away into Nixon’s records. 

From - “American Originals” Treasures from the National Archives

Source: Nixon Library

Image description: President Bill Clinton playing the saxophone at the 14th Anniversary of the Newport Jazz Festival in June, 1993.
Photo from the National Archives.

Image description: President Bill Clinton playing the saxophone at the 14th Anniversary of the Newport Jazz Festival in June, 1993.

Photo from the National Archives.

Asked by Anonymous

WHAT IS THE SCHEDULE FOR GOLD DOLLARS IN 2012--WHAT MONTHS WILL THEY COME OUT AND WHERE CAN YOU PURCHASE THEM?

The U.S. Mint will release the following Presidential $1 Coins in 2012:

  • President Chester Arthur
  • President Grover Cleveland (first term)
  • President Benjamin Harrison
  • President Grover Cleveland (second term)

The coins are golden in color, but not made of gold. They are made of a mixture of metals.

Production of circulating Presidential $1 coins was recently suspended, but collectible versions of the coins will still to be available from the U.S. Mint.

Asked by Anonymous

I collect the Presidential dollar coins but the banks say they have not received them. The release date was Nov. 21st. I was wondering when the banks will receive them. Thank you. Valerie Burns.

Banks can order Presidential $1 coins directly from the U.S. Mint. Unfortunately, we can’t say when they will receive the coins. You should call your bank to find out if have any available before you visit.

You can also order $1 coins directly from the Mint or purchase collector versions of the coins. Learn more about buying Presidential $1 coins.

Anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s Assassination

Today is the anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

The president was shot as he rode in a motorcade through Dallas, Texas. He served less than three years in office before he was killed.

At the time, much of the activity in the country was put on pause as Americans gathered around televisions to watch the nonstop coverage of the assassination and the funeral.

A few day later, many Americans also witnessed the murder of the accused assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald.

Television is credited with creating a shared experience throughout the country since it was the first time many Americans were able to follow a tragedy like this from beginning to end.

Learn more about the JFK assassination.