News From Our Blog

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From the Archives Foundation:

Happy National Teddy Bear Day! Political cartoonist Clifford Berryman is credited with introducing the teddy bear into the American vernacular after President Theodore Roosevelt famously refused to shoot an old, haggard bear during a hunting trip. Berryman changed the old bear into a cute, cuddly “teddy bear”—named for the President—and it became a common symbol in Berryman’s cartoons.  This self-portrait shows Berryman’s “signature style” in the exhibit “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures,” on display in the National Archives Museum’s O’Brien Gallery through January 4, 2015.“Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives with the generous support of Lead Sponsor AT&T. Major additional support provided by the Lawrence F. O’Brien Family and members of the Board of the Foundation for the National Archives.  Image: "Self-Portrait of Clifford Berryman, 1904"

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From the Archives Foundation:

Happy National Teddy Bear Day! Political cartoonist Clifford Berryman is credited with introducing the teddy bear into the American vernacular after President Theodore Roosevelt famously refused to shoot an old, haggard bear during a hunting trip. Berryman changed the old bear into a cute, cuddly “teddy bear”—named for the President—and it became a common symbol in Berryman’s cartoons.

This self-portrait shows Berryman’s “signature style” in the exhibit Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures,” on display in the National Archives Museum’s O’Brien Gallery through January 4, 2015.

“Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” is made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives with the generous support of Lead Sponsor AT&T. Major additional support provided by the Lawrence F. O’Brien Family and members of the Board of the Foundation for the National Archives.

Image: "Self-Portrait of Clifford Berryman, 1904"

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From PBS:

September 5, 1905: Theodore Roosevelt Negotiates a Peaceful Settlement of the Russo-Japanese War
On this day in 1905, peace delegates in New Hampshire signed the Treaty of Portsmouth which officially ended the Russo-Japanese War, a conflict over control of Manchuria and Korea. The Japanese emerged victorious as the first non-Western world power.  Theodore Roosevelt, who helped mediate the treaty negotiations, later won the Nobel Peace Prize for his achievement.  
Watch real footage of Theodore Roosevelt receiving the Nobel Peace Prize with this preview from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.
Photo: Russian and Japanese peace delegates with Teddy Roosevelt in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1905. Theodore Roosevelt Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard University

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From PBS:

September 5, 1905: Theodore Roosevelt Negotiates a Peaceful Settlement of the Russo-Japanese War

On this day in 1905, peace delegates in New Hampshire signed the Treaty of Portsmouth which officially ended the Russo-Japanese War, a conflict over control of Manchuria and Korea. The Japanese emerged victorious as the first non-Western world power.  Theodore Roosevelt, who helped mediate the treaty negotiations, later won the Nobel Peace Prize for his achievement. 

Watch real footage of Theodore Roosevelt receiving the Nobel Peace Prize with this preview from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.

Photo: Russian and Japanese peace delegates with Teddy Roosevelt in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1905. Theodore Roosevelt Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard University

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From the Presidential Libraries:

It’s the Birthday of LBJ!

Lyndon Baines Johnson was born on August 27, 1908, in central Texas, not far from Johnson City, which his family had helped settle. 

In 1937 he campaigned successfully for the House of Representatives on a New Deal platform, effectively aided by his wife, the former Claudia “Lady Bird” Taylor, whom he had married after a whirlwind courtship in 1934. 

During World War II, Lyndon Johnson served briefly in the Navy as a lieutenant commander, receiving a Silver Star in the South Pacific. After six terms in the House, he was elected to the Senate in 1948. In 1953, he became the youngest Minority Leader in Senate history, and the following year, when the Democrats won control, Majority Leader. With rare legislative skill he obtained passage of a number of measures during the Eisenhower Administration. He became, by many accounts, the most powerful Majority Leader of the twentieth century.

LBJ’s “Great Society” program included aid to education, Medicare, urban renewal, beautification, conservation, development of depressed regions, control and prevention of crime and delinquency and removal of obstacles to the right to vote. Read More

Photos: 

Studio portrait of Lyndon B. Johnson at 18 months old, ca. 1910.

Portrait of President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Oval Office. December, 1963.

-from the LBJ Library 

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From PBS:

August 25, 1921: FDR is Diagnosed with Polio
On this day in 1921, Dr. Robert Lovett diagnosed 39-year-old Franklin Roosevelt with infantile paralysis, more commonly known as polio. The diagnosis came a few weeks after a fall into icy waters that left him unable to feel parts of his body and hold his own weight. 
Although there was no cure for polio at the time, FDR participated in rehabilitation classes and swimming exercises to regain his strength before re-entering politics.
Learn about FDR’s recovery process with this preview clip from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.
Photo: President Roosevelt in his wheelchair on the porch at Top Cottage in Hyde Park, NY with his dog, Fala, and Ruthie Bie, granddaughter of the cottage’s caretaker. February 1941. Wikimedia Commons.

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From PBS:

August 25, 1921: FDR is Diagnosed with Polio

On this day in 1921, Dr. Robert Lovett diagnosed 39-year-old Franklin Roosevelt with infantile paralysis, more commonly known as polio. The diagnosis came a few weeks after a fall into icy waters that left him unable to feel parts of his body and hold his own weight.

Although there was no cure for polio at the time, FDR participated in rehabilitation classes and swimming exercises to regain his strength before re-entering politics.

Learn about FDR’s recovery process with this preview clip from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.

Photo: President Roosevelt in his wheelchair on the porch at Top Cottage in Hyde Park, NY with his dog, Fala, and Ruthie Bie, granddaughter of the cottage’s caretaker. February 1941. Wikimedia Commons.

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From the Presidential Libraries:

John F. Kennedy at St. Mark’s Cathedral in Venice while on a trip to Europe with LeMoyne Billings in August 1937. From the JFK Library

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From the Presidential Libraries:

John F. Kennedy at St. Mark’s Cathedral in Venice while on a trip to Europe with LeMoyne Billings in August 1937. 

From the JFK Library