News From Our Blog

Watch live as the Okeanos Explorer, a NOAA research ship, investigates deep-sea habitats and marine life.

Image description: This young green sea turtle swims under the Midway Island Pier in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, Hawaii.
Photo by Greg McFall, NOAA’s National Ocean Service

Image description: This young green sea turtle swims under the Midway Island Pier in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, Hawaii.

Photo by Greg McFall, NOAA’s National Ocean Service

Image description:  The first tubeworms found in the Atlantic Ocean were discovered in August by researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration using remotely operated submarines.
Tubeworms are unlike most other forms of life on Earth, which rely on energy from the sun.  Instead, these creatures are chemosynthetic, getting their energy from chemicals that rise in the hot water of hydrothermal vents in the ocean.
Photo by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Image description: The first tubeworms found in the Atlantic Ocean were discovered in August by researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration using remotely operated submarines.

Tubeworms are unlike most other forms of life on Earth, which rely on energy from the sun. Instead, these creatures are chemosynthetic, getting their energy from chemicals that rise in the hot water of hydrothermal vents in the ocean.

Photo by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Image description: Seventy-five percent of the world’s coral reefs are currently threatened by local and global pressures, according to a 2011 analysis. The most immediate and direct threats arise from local sources, which currently threaten more than 60% of coral reefs. Local threats include impacts from fishing, coastal development, and pollution. Left unchecked, the percent of threatened reefs will increase to more than 90% by 2030 and to nearly all reefs by 2050.
Photo by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Ocean Service

Image description: Seventy-five percent of the world’s coral reefs are currently threatened by local and global pressures, according to a 2011 analysis. The most immediate and direct threats arise from local sources, which currently threaten more than 60% of coral reefs. Local threats include impacts from fishing, coastal development, and pollution. Left unchecked, the percent of threatened reefs will increase to more than 90% by 2030 and to nearly all reefs by 2050.

Photo by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Ocean Service