News From Our Blog

Image description: Today in 1776, the Liberty Bell rang for the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence. 

Image description: Today in 1776, the Liberty Bell rang for the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence. 

Image description: Our national anthem, The Star Spangled Banner, was written by Francis Scott Key in 1814 to commemorate the victory of the United States against Great Britain. In 1931, after more than 40 bills, Congress officially declared that The Star Spangled Banner as the national anthem of the United States. Photo from the Library of Congress

Image description: Our national anthem, The Star Spangled Banner, was written by Francis Scott Key in 1814 to commemorate the victory of the United States against Great Britain. In 1931, after more than 40 bills, Congress officially declared that The Star Spangled Banner as the national anthem of the United States.

Photo from the Library of Congress

Image description

From the National Archives:

Spending the Fourth of July with us? Inspired by a certain celebrity group shot at the Oscars, we invite you to post a #ColonialSelfie on Twitter! 

While out enjoying your Fourth of July, snap a picture with a Founding Father and show us on Twitter. If you don’t run into Thomas Jefferson or Benjamin Franklin, be creative; your #ColonialSelfie can be with anything that was in fashion in 1776! 

Don’t forget to use the #ColonialSelfie hashtag, and send it to us on Twitter at @USNatArchives.

To find out more about July 4 at the National Archives

Image description:

From the Presidential libraries:

First Lady Flags 

After noticing the national flags flying on diplomats’ cars as they arrived at the White House as well as the American and Presidential flags displayed on the President’s car, Betty Ford had a question: “If the President gets flags, why shouldn’t the First Lady?”

In answer Dick Hartwig, then the head of Mrs. Ford’s Secret Service detail, and Rick Sardo, the White House Marine Corps aide, presented her with this specially designed flag on June 24, 1975. Sarah Brinkerhoff, a friend of Hartwig, handmade the pennant for the First Lady’s limousine.

Made of blue satin and trimmed in white lace with blue and red stars, the flag features a pair of red and white bloomers in the center as a play on Mrs. Ford’s maiden name, Bloomer. White text above the bloomers reads, “Don’t Tread on Me.” The letters “E.R.A.” below stand for the Equal Rights Amendment, an indication of Mrs. Ford’s strong support for the proposed amendment that would have given women equality under law through the United States Constitution.

Although it had been designed for her car Mrs. Ford kept the flag on display on her desk in the East Wing.

-from the Ford Library 

Image description: Our next national symbol is the Great Seal of the United States. It was created by a committee headed by Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. Just as the 13 stripes on the flag symbolize the original 13 colonies of the United States, the Great Seal symbolizes this number in the stripes, stars and arrows in the Seal. The inscription: “E Pluribus Unum” means “out of many, one” the same motto that can be seen on the dollar bill. Learn more.

Image description: Our next national symbol is the Great Seal of the United States. It was created by a committee headed by Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams.

Just as the 13 stripes on the flag symbolize the original 13 colonies of the United States, the Great Seal symbolizes this number in the stripes, stars and arrows in the Seal. The inscription: “E Pluribus Unum” means “out of many, one” the same motto that can be seen on the dollar bill.

Learn more.