News From Our Blog

Image description: This photo shows what’s known as a cloud inversion at Mather Point on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon.
Cloud inversions form through the interaction of warm and cold weather masses and occur at the Grand Canyon about once every 10 years.
You can see more photos of the cloud inversion on the Grand Canyon’s Flickr account.
From the Department of Interior:

Over the last few days you might have seen a few photos of the recent and rare inversion(s) at Grand Canyon National Park. We hope one more will be okay. Here’s another stunning photo from Mather Point. NPS Photo by Erin Whittaker

Image description: This photo shows what’s known as a cloud inversion at Mather Point on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon.

Cloud inversions form through the interaction of warm and cold weather masses and occur at the Grand Canyon about once every 10 years.

You can see more photos of the cloud inversion on the Grand Canyon’s Flickr account.

From the Department of Interior:

Over the last few days you might have seen a few photos of the recent and rare inversion(s) at Grand Canyon National Park. We hope one more will be okay. Here’s another stunning photo from Mather Point.

NPS Photo by Erin Whittaker

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From the U.S. Department of Interior:

An amazing sunset viewed from Cape Royal on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. Photo: Randy Langstraat

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From the U.S. Department of Interior:

An amazing sunset viewed from Cape Royal on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon.

Photo: Randy Langstraat

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From the U.S. Department of Interior:

Pan-STARRS comet photographed at the South Rim of the Grand Canyon on March 12th.
It still may be possible to view this comet over the next several days in the northern hemisphere. Use binoculars if you have them.
Start looking 30 minutes after sunset in the direction of sunset. Look low about 10 degrees above the horizon near the top edge of twilight. With your binoculars, you should be able to see the comet head with the tail pointed upward.
Learn more about this comet from NASA. Photo: Rick Jurgen

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From the U.S. Department of Interior:

Pan-STARRS comet photographed at the South Rim of the Grand Canyon on March 12th.

It still may be possible to view this comet over the next several days in the northern hemisphere. Use binoculars if you have them.

Start looking 30 minutes after sunset in the direction of sunset. Look low about 10 degrees above the horizon near the top edge of twilight. With your binoculars, you should be able to see the comet head with the tail pointed upward.

Learn more about this comet from NASA

Photo: Rick Jurgen

Image description: Today is the 94th anniversary of Grand Canyon National Park. Find out how it was established.
This photo was taken at Shoshone Point on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon.
Photo by Michael Quinn, National Park Service

Image description: Today is the 94th anniversary of Grand Canyon National Park. Find out how it was established.

This photo was taken at Shoshone Point on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon.

Photo by Michael Quinn, National Park Service

93rd Anniversary of Grand Canyon National Park

grand canyon

Image description: The Grand Canyon stretches for 277 miles and covers more than 1 million acres of land in Arizona.

Sunday marks the 93rd anniversary of the establishment of the Grand Canyon National Park. On February 26, 1919, Congress officially passed the act establishing the park in Arizona.

Known as one of the world’s greatest natural wonders, the Grand Canyon is 277 miles and is cut down the middle by the Colorado River. The national park covers more than 1 million acres of land in northern Arizona.

Senator Benjamin Harrison was the first to create a bill protecting the Grand Canyon, and pushed for it multiple times. As President, Harrison established the Grand Canyon Forest Reserve in 1893. Senate bills to make it a national park were shot down twice, until finally, in 1919, the Grand Canyon National Park Act was signed by President Woodrow Wilson.

Learn more about the Grand Canyon.