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How to Order a Flag that Flew over the Capitol

The “Star-Spangled Banner,” “Old Glory,” the “Stars and Stripes” — no matter the name, the American flag is a familiar, important symbol of our nation.

And what could be more authentically patriotic than owning a flag that flew on top of the Capitol Building?

Since 1937, when a member of Congress requested a flag flown on the top of the Capitol, a part of the duties of the Architect of the Capitol has been to distribute requested flags to members of Congress - and the general public.

Currently, the Architect of the Capitol fulfills requests from the members of the Senate and the House, averaging about 100,000 flag requests annually with a steadily increasing number of requests each year. To request your own personal 3-by-5-foot or 5-by-8-foot flag, you should contact your representative or senator directly.

To find contact information for your Congressional representatives, visit:

If you’re interested, visit the Architect of the Capitol’s website to learn more about their duties. The position has existed since the laying of the Capitol cornerstone in 1793 - serving as builder and steward of some of the country’s landmarks, including the Capitol Building, the Senate and House office buildings, the Supreme Court, Library of Congress and Botanical Garden.

And to learn more about the flag request process, check out this PDF of a flag request form, the guidelines for ordering flags or the flag policy from the Architect of the Capitol’s office.

Image description: Sailors fold the American flag aboard the USS Mobile Bay in memory of lives lost during the 9/11 terrorist attacks.
Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Walter M. Wayman, U.S. Navy.

Image description: Sailors fold the American flag aboard the USS Mobile Bay in memory of lives lost during the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Walter M. Wayman, U.S. Navy.