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Image description: The Muon g-2 (pronounced gee minus two) is an experiment that will use the Fermilab accelerator complex to create an intense beam of muons – a type of subatomic particle – traveling at nearly the speed of light. The experiment is picking up after a previous muon experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, which concluded in 2001.
In this photo, the massive electromagnet is beginning its 3,200-mile journey from the woods of Long Island to the plains near Chicago, where scientists at Fermilab will refill its storage ring with muons created at Fermilab’s Antiproton Source. The 50-foot-diameter ring is made of steel, aluminum and superconducting wire. It will travel down the East Coast, around the tip of Florida, and up the Mississippi River to Fermilab in Illinois. Transporting the 600-ton magnet requires meticulous precision – just a tilt or a twist of a few degrees could leave the internal wiring irreparably damaged.
Learn more about the Muon g-2 experiment, or follow regular updates on the electromagnet’s location.
Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Image description from Energy.gov.

Image description: The Muon g-2 (pronounced gee minus two) is an experiment that will use the Fermilab accelerator complex to create an intense beam of muons – a type of subatomic particle – traveling at nearly the speed of light. The experiment is picking up after a previous muon experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, which concluded in 2001.

In this photo, the massive electromagnet is beginning its 3,200-mile journey from the woods of Long Island to the plains near Chicago, where scientists at Fermilab will refill its storage ring with muons created at Fermilab’s Antiproton Source. The 50-foot-diameter ring is made of steel, aluminum and superconducting wire. It will travel down the East Coast, around the tip of Florida, and up the Mississippi River to Fermilab in Illinois. Transporting the 600-ton magnet requires meticulous precision – just a tilt or a twist of a few degrees could leave the internal wiring irreparably damaged.

Learn more about the Muon g-2 experiment, or follow regular updates on the electromagnet’s location.

Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Image description from Energy.gov.

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