News From Our Blog

Image description: This photograph of stuffed specimens was taken in 1906 by Thomas Smillie, the first photographer for the Smithsonian. It is an example of the day-to-day documentation of Smithsonian life and museum installations that Smillie and his staff regularly performed. He used blue cyanotypes like this one to keep track of the glass-plate negatives his staff made, in part because the medium presented a quick and inexpensive way to create photographic prints. 
Image courtesy of Smithsonian Institution Archives

Image description: This photograph of stuffed specimens was taken in 1906 by Thomas Smillie, the first photographer for the Smithsonian. It is an example of the day-to-day documentation of Smithsonian life and museum installations that Smillie and his staff regularly performed. He used blue cyanotypes like this one to keep track of the glass-plate negatives his staff made, in part because the medium presented a quick and inexpensive way to create photographic prints. 

Image courtesy of Smithsonian Institution Archives

We welcome your comments if you are 13 or older, and hope that our conversations here will be polite. You are responsible for the content of your comments.

We do not discriminate against any views, but may delete any of the following:

  • violent, obscene, profane, hateful, or racist comments
  • comments that threaten or harm the reputation of any person or organization
  • advertisements or solicitations of any kind
  • comments that suggest or encourage illegal activity
  • multiple off-topic posts or repetitive posts that are copied and pasted
  • personal information including, but not limited to, e-mail addresses, telephone numbers, mailing addresses, or identification numbers

In short: be nice and add to the discussion. If you continually violate this policy, we may limit your ability to comment in the future. If you have any questions or comments about this policy, please e-mail us.